Is there any new evidence on diagnosis of urinary tract infection (UTI)? How about on management and follow-up? Is it time to throw away your notes on the subject from your residency?

Yes. Yes. And, probably yes. UTI is a common diagnosis in pediatrics, one with a rich history of protocolized management, much of it without a basis in evidence. In 1999, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) published a practice parameter summarizing the state-of-the art in diagnosis and management of UTIs in 2- to 24-month-old children.1 Since then, there has been a steady stream of studies, large and small, adding to the body of evidence, some challenging previous and often long-held beliefs and practices about the diagnosis. In September 2011, the AAP Subcommittee on Urinary Tract Infection, Steering Committee on Quality Improvement and Management, released an updated practice guideline on diagnosis and management of UTIs in 2- to...

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