As pediatric hospital medicine (PHM) develops and matures, attempts have been made to describe the field and the individuals who practice it.1–3  Defining what PHM practitioners do is complex, and descriptive categories are often presented with dichotomous alternatives regarding responsibilities (eg, teaching or not, research/scholarly activity or not) and scope of practice (eg, limited to inpatient service or broader, full array of resources or not). Frequently, the differences are overly simplified according to the type of institution in which the pediatric hospitalists work, labeled “academic centers” and “community hospitals.”1,3,4  However, the designation of 1 setting as “academic” implies that the alternative (community hospitals) is not academic, a distinction that spills over to labeling individual hospitalists as academic or nonacademic. According to Freed and Dunham, academic hospitalists are those with a full-time faculty appointment, whereas hospitalists with a part-time or no faculty...

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