Feeding problems in infancy and early childhood are very common. Twenty-five percent to 45% of typically developing children reportedly experience some type of feeding problem. Although many of these issues are temporary, with no significant clinical impact, psychologically traumatic events can result in acute food refusal with serious risk of harm, either necessitating or occurring during an inpatient hospitalization. Emerging literature and diagnostic entities are focusing on the ways psychological stress can precipitate avoidant and restrictive food intake. Recent changes in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5), have brought renewed attention to psychological trauma in young children that results in disordered eating. In the present article, we examine iatrogenic food refusal in the context of medical traumatic stress of a 5-year-old girl to demonstrate diagnostic consideration and treatment strategies.

K.G. was a 5-year-old otherwise healthy girl without restrictive or picky eating before presentation...

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