The term “equal opportunity” has been used loosely for decades. Disparities in pay, promotion, leadership, funding, and career advancement have existed for women in medicine.1–7  In the United States, 35% to 36% of all physicians are women and women also compose 45% of the US workforce. Since Dr Elizabeth Blackwell graduated from medical school in 1849, progression in gender equity and parity has been very slow and disproportionate to the number of women in medicine. Today, >50% of women enter medical school and, even though the proportion of women in all academic ranks has increased since 2009, women only represent a majority of faculty (58%) at the instructor level.4,5  From 2003 to 2018, the proportion of women serving as division and section chiefs has increased from 16% to 29%. This rate of increase has only been at ∼1% per year. Women...

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