A 3,340-g 40 4/7-week-gestation male infant was delivered by a 27-year-old gravida 1, para 0 woman whose pregnancy was unremarkable. The woman had prenatal care including fetal ultrasonography at 12, 20, and 40 weeks’ gestation. At 12 weeks’ gestation, a nuchal translucency (NT) was identified. A 4-chamber heart was identified; outflow tract visualization was attempted at the 20-week ultrasonography, but not recognized. The plaintiff obstetrician pointed out that outflow tract visualization became standard by the time of this fetal ultrasonography and should have diligently been identified, especially because of the presence of NT, a finding associated with cardiac defects. Labor was induced for postdates. The membranes were ruptured 6 hours before proceeding to a vaginal birth. At delivery, except for color, the infant was a well-appearing vigorous male infant without apparent dysmorphology. A nurse from the newborn intensive care unit was present at delivery and assigned an Apgar score of...

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