A 1,560-g, appropriate-for-gestational age, 32-week-gestation female neonate was born to a 22-year-old gravida 1, para 0 mother who has had insulin-dependent diabetes since age 10 years. During her pregnancy, the mother developed hypertension, for which she was treated with methyldopa and labetolol. Her diabetes was poorly controlled. On the day of delivery, her hemoglobin A1c was very high at 9.9. Because of severe abdominal pain, the mother went to the hospital. Fetal monitoring showed tachycardia of 165 beats/min with minimum variability and late decelerations. The obstetrician retained by the plaintiff maintained that the tracings from the time of admission mandated an immediate delivery. The bedside nurses said they informed the physician of these findings. After several hours, the fetal heart rate became higher, the decelerations worsened, and variability disappeared. Oxygen and antenatal steroids were given. The fetal tracings became more ominous. Four hours after admission to the hospital, fetal bradycardia...

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