It began as a freshman medical student in 1944 at Washington University in St. Louis. Dr. Ronzoni, who ran the biochemistry course, was always on the lookout for students with an interest and talent in biochemistry. She sent me to Dr. Alexis F. Hartmann Sr, who put me to work, directed my interest toward pediatrics, and proved a magnetic and inspirational mentor. Measuring the utilization of “corn glycogen” in sick infants was my first exposure to carbohydrate metabolism. Then, with Drs. Hartmann and JV Cooke, we worked out the pathogenesis of “well water” methemoglobinemia that appeared in the Journal of Pediatrics in 1947. During residency at St. Louis Children’s, whenever I had a month’s rotation on child psychiatry, “the chief” would send me to a basic science lab to learn either a micromethod for measuring tocopherol (vitamin E) with Dr. Lowery in pharmacology or a technique for measuring insulin in...

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