In the last 2 decades there has been an accumulation of evidence of a possible resurgence of kernicterus in North America.1,2 Many of the affected infants also had glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) deficiency, suggesting a relationship between the 2 conditions, as has been illustrated by several case reports.3–7 In addition, this enzyme deficiency has recently been listed among the 10 most important factors contributory to nonhemolytic neonatal jaundice.8 Despite this, there are still many pediatricians and neonatologists practicing in the United States or Canada who regard G-6-PD deficiency as a condition confined to the Middle East or Orient and with little application to the patients under their care. Even as recently as 1998 and 1999, Maisels and Newman9 and Maisels8were of the opinion that many American pediatricians did not think about G-6-PD deficiency as a likely cause for severe neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. Brown et al10...

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