Outcomes research assesses the end results of health care from the perspective of those who receive the care, those who provide it, and those who pay for it. The article by Karin Minter and her colleagues1 at the Frank Porter Graham Child Development Center in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, provides important new information related to the functional outcomes of otitis media (OM) in early childhood. Their study documenting the relationship of otitis media with effusion (OME) and hearing loss with functional measures of attention and behavior obtained from parents, teachers, and clinicians appears in this issue ofPediatrics.1 They conducted this prospective cohort study in 85 children whose middle ear and hearing status had been closely monitored from 6 months to 4 years of age. The diagnosis of OME was based on both pneumatic otoscopy and tympanometry. Audiologists who were unaware of the middle ear findings performed hearing...

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