While reading the article by Ah-Tye et al, which appeared in the June 2001 issue of Pediatrics, I was reminded of an incident early in my career when I was asked by a pediatric infectious disease specialist to look in the ears of a child who was being seen for recurrent acute otitis media with effusion (OME). In the corridor consultation, I was told that the 16-month-old child had recurrent acute otitis media and middle ear effusion that had been present almost constantly since 2 months of age. The child had been seen by several primary care physicians as well as 2 otolaryngologists and was now on his third set of tympanostomy tubes. Otorrhea had been almost continuously present since the first set of tubes was placed at 5 months of age. Aside from history of OME, the child was generally healthy with normal growth and development and absence...

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