In an article in this month’s issue, Drukker et al from Jerusalem, Israel, are to be congratulated for writing a clear, precise, and provocative article concerning ethnic disparities in the selection of children for renal transplantation. Their article documents the remarkable finding that religious and ethnic biases do not affect access to transplantation in the midst of political upheaval. Their noteworthy article demonstrates that in Israel children are chosen for cadaveric renal transplantation regardless of ethnicity—(Israeli or Arab or religious status [Jewish, Muslim, Druse, or Christian faith]). This finding is reassuring not only to pediatric nephrologists, but to all physicians who care for children. The Jerusalem group deserves our admiration.

In the discussion, the authors make a comparison between children in Israel, where there exists equal access to cadaveric kidneys for Jewish and Arab children despite a tense political situation, and children in the United States, where access for...

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