In Reply.—

Dr Beutels and Ms Viney suggest in their letter that we have departed from accepted methods for temporary health states in children. Valuing temporary health states has not received much attention in the health-state valuation literature and, contrary to their assertion, there are no widely accepted standards for valuing temporary health states. Several approaches have been suggested but not widely used.1–4  Our approach draws on one suggested method in which the temporary state is converted into a short-term chronic state to calculate the utility (or disutility) associated with a particular health state. The number of days traded off is divided by the length of the health state. This utility weight is then included in the cost-effectiveness analysis by prorating by the fraction of a year spent in the temporary health state. This method was modified for application to children's health by using the...

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