Schoenecker and Flynn fault the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) in its assessment that there is insufficient information to make a recommendation about routine screening for developmental dysplasia of the hip. They fault the USPSTF for (1) use of a “flawed” methodology that does not include data from models and (2) failure to recognize current clinical practice in terms of the use of surgery (and, therefore, the resultant risk of complications and, thus, the reach of complications thereof) and the choice of ultrasound versus physical examination screening.

The USPSTF is an independent panel charged by Congress with the responsibility of reviewing the scientific evidence for clinical preventive services and develop evidence-based recommendations for the health care community. The USPSTF bases its recommendations on systematic evidence reviews that follow an established and transparent methodology used by all the evidence-based practice centers that conduct these reviews under contract with the Agency...

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