A robust discussion followed the presentation of each paper at the forum. In the sections below we have tried to capture the most salient points raised during the discussion. As a result, many of these points were not considered in the articles that comprise this supplement but are highly relevant to the screening, surveillance, and reporting of BMI.

There was general agreement that BMI was a sound epidemiologic tool for the assessment of overweight and obesity in populations, as well as a useful clinical tool. Several limitations with respect to the use of BMI were raised or confirmed. These limitations included use of triceps skinfold measurements to further differentiate children at risk whose BMI was between the 85th and 95th percentiles, additional efforts to clarify BMI measurements beyond the 97th percentile, self- or parent-reported height and weight, and challenges with communication of the meaning of BMI to parents. As Freedman...

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