In this month's issue of Pediatrics, Van Cleave et al describe barriers to and potential facilitators of publishing quality-improvement (QI) research, which are based on a 2007 workshop, key informant interviews, and a literature review over the years 2001–2009. We strongly agree with the authors' conclusion that “Publishing pediatric quality improvement presents challenges, but it advances the science of quality improvement, leading to more rapid improvement in pediatric care and children's health outcomes.”

The importance of participating in QI activities is emphasized throughout clinical care. It is now a component of residency training and required for American Board of Pediatrics maintenance of certification. However, most practicing pediatricians have had little formal training in QI methods. In our experience, this has created confusion about the role of QI. For example, although there are many interventions that can improve care delivery (eg, hiring an additional nurse practitioner, adopting an electronic...

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