BACKGROUND:

Treatment of adolescent migraine remains a significant unmet medical need. We compared the efficacy and safety of 3 doses of sumatriptan and naproxen sodium (suma/nap) combination tablets to placebo in the acute treatment of adolescent migraine.

METHODS:

This randomized, parallel group study in 12 to 17 year olds required 2 to 8 migraines per month (typically lasting >3 hours untreated) for ≥6 months. Subjects entered a 12-week run-in phase, treating 1 moderate-to-severe migraine (attack 1) with single-blind placebo. Subjects reporting headache pain 2 hours after dosing were randomly assigned into a 12-week double-blind phase, treating 1 moderate-to-severe migraine (attack 2) with placebo (n = 145), suma/nap 10/60 mg (n = 96), 30/180 mg (n = 97), or 85/500 mg (n = 152). The primary end point was the percentage of subjects pain-free at 2 hours.

RESULTS:

The attack 2 adjusted (age; baseline pain severity) 2-hour pain-free rates were higher with suma/nap 10/60 mg (29%; adjusted P = .003), 30/180 mg (27%; adjusted P = .003), and 85/500 mg (24%; adjusted P = .003) versus placebo (10%). Posthoc primary end-point analyses did not demonstrate differences among the 3 doses or an age-by-treatment interaction. Statistically significant differences were found for 85/500 mg versus placebo for sustained pain-free 2 to 24 hours (23% vs 9%; adjusted P = .008), 2-hour photophobia-free (59% vs 41%; adjusted P = .008), and 2-hour phonophobia-free (60% vs 42%; adjusted P = .008). Analyses of other pain, associated symptoms, rescue medication use, and health outcome end points supported higher efficacy for active doses versus placebo. All active doses were well tolerated.

CONCLUSIONS:

All doses of suma/nap were well tolerated, providing similarly effective acute treatment of adolescent migraine pain and associated symptoms, as compared with placebo.

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