Parents’ immunization decision-making is complex.1 It can be influenced by perceptions of disease risk and vaccine effectiveness as well as external factors, such as school immunization policies and a health care providers’ recommendation. Parents’ immunization decisions are not always based on rational logic that incorporates scientific evidence. Rather, the cultural, emotional, political, and social context within which decisions are made may introduce substantial irrationality. Currently, we have only a rudimentary understanding of the effects of this social context on parents’ immunization behavior. In this month’s Pediatrics, Brunson applies an innovative methodology called “social network analysis” to gain insight into how peer networks and information sources affect immunization decisions.

During the 1950s, Solomon Asch conducted seminal studies of the impact of social influence on judgment. In one set of experiments, several groups were asked to match the length of 3 lines drawn on a piece a paper...

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