To improve children’s health outcomes and to save health care dollars, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), Institute of Medicine, and others have called for health care delivery transformation.1,2  They recommend community child health activities and advocacy that address morbidities such as asthma, environmental toxicity, mental health concerns, obesity, substance abuse, and violence. The Residency Review Committee of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education has required community health and advocacy educational components. The AAP and others are sponsoring residency programming and faculty development, learning collaboratives, and issue-based community health and advocacy opportunities.

With all this emphasis on community child health, the findings in the article “Pediatrician’s Involvement in Community Child Health from 2004 to 2010” appear counterintuitive. Using AAP periodic surveys, Minkovitz et al have been monitoring pediatricians’ involvement in community child health. In 1989, 56.6% of pediatricians reported community health engagement, rising to...

You do not currently have access to this content.