What and why? As health care professionals, we must address both of these questions in scientific inquiry as well as in clinical practice. Most times, facts (the “what”) are relatively easy to come by. The reasons (the “why”) behind these events are usually more difficult to discover and understand. Let us look at the example of head computed tomography (CT) in a group of neonates. There are 2 facts here. First, in an investigation of 4107 term infants diagnosed with encephalopathy by Barnette et al in this issue of Pediatrics, CT examinations were performed in 22.7%, with 2.4% of this population having >1 CT examination. Second, the investigators remind us that MRI is better than CT at prognostic evaluation in this scenario. From these facts, the investigators concluded that a preferred imaging strategy would be ultrasonography followed by MRI, without a CT examination.

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