We thank Dr Schroeder for his comments on our article. We agree with Dr Schroeder that some children may have bacteriuria even when they are asymptomatic. We disagree, however, on the prevalence and clinical implications of this finding.

Schroeder states that 1.4% of children have asymptomatic bacteriuria, and because the prevalence of urinary tract infection (UTI) among those tested is low (∼5%), a large proportion of children with apparent UTIs actually may have asymptomatic bacteriuria and are therefore being misdiagnosed. However, closer reading of the original articles describing the asymptomatic bacteriuria (by using a method of urine collection less prone to contamination, such as suprapubic aspiration), show that the 1.4% number is the period prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria (cumulative over the 12-month follow-up period). At any 1 point in time after 1 month of age, only 0% to 0.4% (see Fig 3 in the article by Wettergren et al...

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