Young blood donors contribute substantially to the US blood supply, yet these are the donors at greatest risk of immediate reactions and other adverse health effects related to their blood donations. Sixteen and 17-year-old adolescents constitute only 2.8% of the US population, but they contribute an estimated 10% of the blood supply, with more than 1 million donations per year.1 Mass recruitment and blood collection are scheduled at high schools despite the consistent demonstration that teenage blood donors are at significantly increased risk of phlebotomy-related reactions and injuries after blood donation as compared with adults.2 Approximately one-third of all donor reactions and more than half of all syncope-related injuries occur in adolescents and young adults.2 In addition to the immediate hazards of the donation process, iron deficiency has become well recognized as a complication of frequent blood donation, and high school–age students are particularly vulnerable. How did...

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