Purpose: Motor vehicle crashes (MVCs) are the leading cause of death for children ages 1-14 years in the United States. Car safety seats are effective in decreasing the risk of injury and death, and rear-facing car safety seats (RFCSSs) are significantly more effective than forward-facing seats in protecting children less than 24 months of age. While the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends that children remain in a RFCSS until at least 2 years of age, many families turn their children forward-facing before their second birthday. We examined the prevalence and determinants of RFCSS use in a sample of children 17-19 months of age born at a university hospital. Methods: Participants were caregivers of children born November 2013-May 2014. Participants completed a telephone survey in 2015-2016 focused on car seat knowledge, attitudes, and use. The prevalence and odds of RFCSS use in reference to hypothesized determinants were estimated. Adjusted odds...

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