Initial reports of congenital Zika virus (ZIKV) infection focused on microcephaly at birth with severe brain anomalies; the phenotype has broadened to include microcephaly that develops after birth and neurodevelopmental sequelae. In this narrative review, we summarize medical literature describing motor abnormalities and epilepsy in infants with evidence of congenital ZIKV infection and provide information on the impact of these conditions. Specific scenarios are used to illustrate the complex clinical course in infants with abnormalities that are consistent with congenital Zika syndrome. A search of the English-language medical literature was done to identify motor abnormalities and epilepsy in infants with evidence of congenital ZIKV infection by using Medline and PubMed, Embase, Scientific Electronic Library Online, Scopus, the OpenGrey Repository, and the Grey Literature Report in Public Health. Search terms included “Zika” only and “Zika” in combination with any of the following terms: “epilepsy,” “seizure,” “motor,” and “cerebral palsy.” Clinical features of motor abnormalities and epilepsy in these children were reviewed. Thirty-six publications were identified; 8 were selected for further review. Among infants with clinical findings that are consistent with congenital Zika syndrome, 54% had epilepsy and 100% had motor abnormalities. In these infants, impairments that are consistent with diagnoses of cerebral palsy and epilepsy occur frequently. Pyramidal and extrapyramidal motor abnormalities were notable for their early development and co-occurrence. Prompt identification of potential disabilities enables early intervention to improve the quality of life for affected children. Long-term studies of developmental outcomes and interventions in children with congenital ZIKV infection are needed.

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