Cerebral palsy (CP) is a heterogeneous disorder relating to permanent motor disabilities, neuroimaging findings, subtypes, associated impairments, and etiologies. Although the exact etiology of CP is often impossible to establish, several antenatal, perinatal, and postnatal risk factors have been identified. The birth prevalence of CP has been stable at ∼2 per 1000 for several decades. However, recent studies reveal a decreasing trend in prevalence in some high-income countries.2–4  This decrease has not been ascribed to new specific preventive interventions but to general improvements in antenatal, obstetric, and neonatal care.

In this issue of Pediatrics, Strøm et al report that offspring of mothers with a wide range of chronic maternal conditions have an increased risk of developing CP. With a robust data set, including >1 million live-born children recorded in Norwegian health registries, they found that several autoimmune conditions had twofold to threefold increased adjusted...

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