BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES:

Adolescent electronic vapor product (EVP) usage continues to increase and is associated with heightened engagement in other risk behaviors. However, there is limited research on associations between youth EVP use and sexual risk behaviors (SRBs). In this study, we examined how current youth EVP and/or cigarette usage, as well as EVP usage frequency, is related to several SRBs.

METHODS:

Respondents (N = 12 667) of the 2017 National Youth Risk Behavior Survey were categorized by previous 30-day EVP and/or cigarette usage: nonuse, EVP use only, cigarette use only, or dual use. Separately, respondents were categorized by previous 30-day EVP usage frequency: 0, 1 to 9, 10 to 29, or 30 days. Ten SRBs were identified as dependent variables. Adjusted prevalence ratios were calculated by using modified Poisson regression to determine associations between SRBs and both current EVP and/or cigarette usage and EVP usage frequency. Linear contrasts compared adjusted prevalence ratios across usage and frequency categories.

RESULTS:

Youth EVP-only users and dual users were more likely than nonusers to engage in 9 of 10 SRBs. Prevalence proportions did not differ between EVP-only users and dual users for 7 of 10 behaviors. Occasional EVP users were more likely than nonusers to engage in 9 of 10 SRBs and were similarly as likely as frequent and daily users to engage in all 10 SRBs.

CONCLUSIONS:

EVP usage among US high school students, with or without concurrent cigarette use, was associated with heightened engagement in several SRBs. Prevalence of engagement in most SRBs did not differ among occasional, frequent, and daily EVP users.

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