The presentation of a child requiring emergency care or resuscitation in the ambulatory pediatric office is an uncommon event but can be distressing when it does occur. In data from several decades ago, it was suggested that many pediatric offices saw multiple children requiring emergency intervention each week. However, in a more recent study, researchers suggests that such emergencies are far less frequent, with <1% of pediatric emergency medical services (EMS) transports originating from the office setting. In this issue of Pediatrics, Abulebda et al examine preparedness for and performance during these events and report that, in a selected group of practices, appropriate equipment was present in 82% of practices, whereas only 57% were prepared with policies and protocols addressing such events, including regular self-assessments and drills. In an evaluation of office responses, assessed during simulated patient presentations of asthma and seizure, it was found that...

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