Previously identified barriers to diverse inclusion in research include participant-level factors, such as transportation, child care, and marginalization by academic medicine. Efforts to overcome these barriers have generally focused on participant-level levers, such as participation incentives and efforts to optimize subsequent contact. Another barrier could be personally mediated racism, defined as differential assumptions about and actions toward others according to their race, which can occur intentionally or unintentionally.

We conducted a secondary analysis of data from the Bronchiolitis Follow-up Intervention Trial (BeneFIT), in which researchers randomly assigned previously healthy children hospitalized for bronchiolitis to an automatic (the control group) versus as-needed (PRN) (the intervention group) posthospitalization follow-up visit. Enrollment was limited to children whose parents spoke English or Spanish; however, parent language preference was only recorded for enrolled patients. The electronic medical record was used to collect demographic data, including insurance type as a proxy for...

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