Our understanding of hereditary cancer predisposition continues to expand, with more than 100 genes and associated syndromes already identified. With an estimated 17.5% of patients with cancer having germline cancer–predisposing mutations, expanded genetic testing continues to detect potentially affected families. Adolescents and young adults (AYAs) are often included in this testing, even when the mutations identified are associated with later-onset disease. This diagnostic expansion amplifies the need for pediatricians to know how to best support these patients, including counseling about mitigating cancer-risk behaviors and managing any associated psychosocial impact. Further study is needed to identify this impact and evaluate whether knowledge of hereditary cancer risk in these patients elicits a different psychosocial reaction than knowledge of their family history of cancer alone.

In this issue of Pediatrics, McDonnell et al present results from a cross-sectional, mixed-methods study evaluating AYA patients whose mothers have undergone BRCA testing....

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