Understanding the legacy of the racial/ethnic and economic segregation of pools and beaches is necessary as drowning disparities in the United States widen. Chicago’s history includes a racially motivated drowning at a segregated beach that triggered the 1919 race riots, the building of mini-pools, too shallow for swimming, in response to riots in 1966, and disinvestment in public pools into the 1980s. Knowing that children are more likely to swim if their parents swim, we hypothesized that, in Chicago, intergenerational relationships between a child’s swim skills and their parent’s swimming experiences would be impacted by race/ethnicity.

This cross-sectional survey used the Voices of Child Health in Chicago Parent Panel to ascertain parent and child experiences with swim lessons and swimming skills. Responses were obtained from parents in Chicago households with child(ren) <18 years of age from November 2020 to February 2021. Analyses focused on responses...

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