Researchers frequently find peer effects from grade school through college. As one example, a study found that elementary students did better in math and reading when more peers in their class had attended preschool, perhaps because attending preschool had prepared students for classroom routines, thus reducing disruptions and allowing all students to make faster progress. Nearly all such studies confine their outcomes of interest to those measuring academic performance. In this issue of Pediatrics, Dudovitz et al expand the body of research on peer effects in schools by observing how assignment into classes with higher-performing students led to the adoption of better health behaviors, thus growing our understanding of the ways that a shared classroom can lead to shared attitudes and behaviors.

As a child progresses through school it becomes more likely that they will find themselves sorted into classes separated by students’ academic performance,...

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