International research shows ceiling fans cause head injuries in children, often when children are playfully thrown in the air or accidentally lifted too close to the fan; or they climb or jump on furniture, especially bunk beds.1–6  Although most injuries are minor, skull fractures were reported in 5% to 18% of cases treated in emergency departments in Australia.1,2  Metal ceiling fans can cause dramatic penetrating injuries to the skull; one child died of such an injury in Iraq and severe injuries may require neurosurgery.1–6  The incidence of injuries from ceiling fans in the United States is unknown. This study describes pediatric traumatic head injuries from ceiling fans seen in emergency departments in the United States.

A publicly available, nationally representative sample of emergency department visits reported to the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS) was queried for patients...

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