Pertussis vaccination during pregnancy has been implemented in many high-resource countries. Recent data from the United States, the United Kingdom, and South America demonstrate its effectiveness in reducing infant pertussis in the first 2 months of life.1–3  However, suppression or “blunting” of the infant’s subsequent response to primary immunization by maternally derived antibody has been demonstrated for many antigens.4–6  Voysey et al compiled data on 7630 infants from 32 studies in 17 countries and demonstrated that preexisting maternally derived antibody inhibited infant antibody responses to priming doses for 20 of 21 vaccine antigens evaluated, including pertussis, with antibody responses for some antigens suppressed for periods up to 24 months. Other reports have documented that tetanus toxoid and reduced diphtheria toxoid and acellular pertussis vaccine (Tdap) administration to pregnant persons suppresses primary infant antibody responses to pertussis, diphtheria, and pneumococcal conjugate vaccines.4–...

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