I know of no contemporary pediatrician who believes that the cutting of deciduous teeth causes skin rashes. But, almost all the great figures in the history of pediatrics believed firmly that teething was associated with a riety of rashes. Michael Underwood, who more than anyone else laid the foundation of modern pediatrics, wrote about tooth-rashes as follows:

A very common rash, appears chiefly in teething children, which yery much resembles the measles, and has been sometimes mistaken for it. It is preceded by sickness at the stomach, but is attended by very little fever; though the rash continues very florid for three days, like the measles, but does not dry off in the manner of that disease. . . .

While the double or eye-teeth are cutting, I have noticed a rash Which at its first appearance is very similar to the above, and has likewise been mistaken for the measles. It, however, soon spreads into larger spots and patches of bright red, and afterwards of a darker hue, resembling the ill-looking petechiae which appear in bad fevers, but is, nevertheless, of a benign nature. It is, indeed, attended with some fever, arising possibly from the irritation occasioned by teething, and has been followed by small and hard round tumours on the legs, which softening in two or three days, always appear as if they would suppurate, though I believe they never do . . . [? erythema nodosum, T. E. C., Jr.]

I have seen a third kind of rash, in appearance resembling the measles, and, like it, covering the whole body, but with larger intermediate patches, like the eruption in the scarlet fever. . . .

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