The 1995 conviction of Waneta Hoyt in Tioga County, New York, for the murders of her five children between 1965 and 1971 has resulted in considerable publicity. Much of the notoriety stems from the fact that in a landmark 1972 paper by Alfred Steinschneider published in Pediatrics these same babies were described as having succumbed to sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). The appellation landmark is warranted because this paper has been quoted more than any other in the SIDS field—404 times between 1974 and 1996 in the journals surveyed by SciSearch—and led directly to the widespread practice of using cardiorespiratory monitors to prevent SIDS. With justification the public is bewildered at how such a heinous crime could go undetected for so many years, and how a prestigious medical journal could publish a paper that had so much influence and yet turned out to be so...

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