Suicide is the second leading cause of death among US adolescents; data from the Youth Behavior Risk Survey indicates nearly 19% of youth reported seriously considering suicide, and 9% reported a suicide attempt within the past year.1 To date, suicide research in adolescents has largely been focused on neurotypical youth. Autistic youth experience elevated risk for suicidal thoughts and behaviors,2–4  with a recent cohort study finding autistic individuals were three times more likely to attempt and die by suicide.5 Screening for suicide is a critical first step in identifying youth at risk who may require immediate intervention,6 and screening has been successfully implemented across levels of pediatric care that often serve autistic youth. However, efforts to prevent suicide after risk has been identified are not well understood in the context of autism. Although advances...

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