Remote patient monitoring (RPM) is a form of telemedicine that involves the collection and transmission of health data from a patient to their health care team by using digital health technologies. RPM can be leveraged to aggregate and visualize longitudinal patient-generated health data for proactive clinical management and engagement of the patient and family in a child’s health care. Collection of remote data has been considered standard of care for years in some chronic pediatric conditions. However, software limitations, gaps in access to the Internet and technology devices, digital literacy, insufficient reimbursement, and other challenges have prevented expansion of RPM in pediatric medicine on a wide scale. Recent technological advances in remote devices and software, coupled with a shift toward virtual models of care, have created a need to better understand how RPM can be leveraged in pediatrics to improve the health of more children, especially for children with special health care needs who are reliant on high-quality chronic disease management. In this article, we define RPM for the general pediatric health care provider audience, provide case examples of existing RPM models, discuss advantages of and limitations to RPM (including how data are collected, evaluated, and managed), and provide a list of current RPM resources for clinical practitioners. Finally, we propose considerations for expansion of this health care delivery approach for children, including clinical infrastructure, equitable access to digital health care, and necessary reimbursement. The overarching goal is to advance health for children by adapting RPM technologies as appropriate and beneficial for patients, families, and providers alike.

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