In this issue of Pediatrics, Schupmann et al1 detail findings of a survey of the US public regarding acceptable risks in pediatric research, specifically noting the role that high social value plays in one’s willingness to consider higher risk. The authors assessed respondents’ views of acceptable risks with 3 scenarios of increasing level of potential social value: developing treatments with fewer side effects, developing treatments to extend life, and developing curative treatments. Although US regulations permit pediatric research that poses minor increases over minimal risk, some argue that it is unethical to expose children to any research risk of nontherapeutic procedures, such as a biopsy or experimental drug, that benefit others but not the child participating in the research. In the study by Schupmann et al, most (84.5%) respondents believed it appropriate to expose children to research risks to gather information to benefit others. Overall, ∼50%...

You do not currently have access to this content.