Sickle cell disease (SCD), a group of inherited disorders, is a bellwether example of a chronic, disabling, life-threatening condition that is disproportionately underserved by the medical community. SCD is arguably associated with the most significant health inequities of both the 20th and 21st centuries. Although these inequities, which are linked to historical interpersonal and institutional racism, have been long recognized, there has been scant progress in closing the health care gaps.1 SCD affects at least 100c000 individuals in the United States, the vast majority being Black or African American individuals.1 Abnormal hemoglobin produced in SCD causes red blood cells (RBCs) to sickle, clogging blood flow and leading to vasoocclusive crises and potential impacts on every organ system. Persons with SCD experience numerous complications, including recurrent episodes of severe pain, pneumonia and acute chest syndrome, stroke, and organ damage. Estimated life expectancy of those with SCD in...

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