The 2010 recommended childhood and adolescent immunization schedules have been approved by the American Academy of Pediatrics, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the American Academy of Family Physicians. There are 3 schedules: one for children 0 through 6 years of age, one for people 7 through 18 years of age, and a catch-up immunization schedule for children and adolescents who start late or fall behind. These schedules reflect current recommendations for the use of vaccines licensed by the US Food and Drug Administration and include the following changes from last year:

  • Reference to the recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices for use of influenza A (H1N1) 2009 monovalent vaccine1  is included in a footnote.

  • Revaccination with meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MCV4) is recommended for children who remain at increased risk for meningococcal disease. A dose of MCV4 should be administered after 3 years in children who received the initial MCV4 dose at ages 2 through 6 years and after 5 years if the first dose was given at age 7 years or older. Additional doses of MCV4 are then given every 5 years.2 

  • Recommendations on use of combination vaccines have been updated (the use of a combination vaccine generally is preferred over separate injections of its equivalent component vaccines). The final dose in the inactivated poliovirus vaccine series should be administered on or after the 4th birthday and at least 6 months following the previous dose. If 4 doses are administered before age 4 years, an additional (fifth) dose should be administered at age 4 through 6 years.3 

  • Recommendations for use of the recently licensed bivalent human papillomavirus vaccine in females and the quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine in males are included.

  • Most of the footnotes for the individual vaccines have been revised to provide additional information and to clarify recommendations provided in the schedules.

Clinically significant adverse events that follow immunization should be reported to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS). Guidance about how to obtain and complete a VAERS form can be obtained on the Internet at www.vaers.hhs.gov or by calling 800-822-7967. Statements from the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices with details of recommendations for individual vaccines, including recommendations for children with high-risk conditions, are available at www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/ACIP-list.htm. Further information can be found in the Red Book (2009) and at Red Book Online (www.aapredbook.org). Information on new vaccine releases, vaccine supplies, interim recommendations resulting from vaccine shortages, and statements on specific vaccines can be found at www.aapredbook.org/news/vaccstatus.shtml and www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/ACIP-list.htm.

Joseph A. Bocchini Jr, MD, Chairperson

John S. Bradley, MD

Michael T. Brady, MD

Henry H. Bernstein, DO

Carrie L. Byington, MD

Margaret C. Fisher, MD

Mary P. Glode, MD

Mary Anne Jackson, MD

Harry L. Keyserling, MD

David W. Kimberlin, MD

Walter A. Orenstein, MD

Gordon E. Schutze, MD

Rodney E. Willoughby Jr, MD

Beth P. Bell, MD

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Robert Bortolussi, MD

Canadian Paediatric Society

Richard D. Clover, MD

American Academy of Family Physicians

Marc A. Fischer, MD

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Richard L. Gorman, MD

National Institutes of Health

Lucia Lee, MD

Food and Drug Administration

R. Douglas Pratt, MD

Food and Drug Administration

Jennifer S. Read, MD, MS, MPH, DTM&H

Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health

Bruce G. Gellin, MD, MPH

National Vaccine Program Office

Jeffrey R. Starke, MD

American Thoracic Society

Jack Swanson, MD

AAP Committee on Practice and Ambulatory Medicine

H. Cody Meissner, MD

Lorry G. Rubin, MD

Larry K. Pickering, MD

Editor, Red Book

Carol J. Baker, MD

Associate Editor, Red Book

Sarah S. Long, MD

Associate Editor, Red Book

Jennifer Frantz, MPH

This document is copyrighted and is property of the American Academy of Pediatrics and its Board of Directors. All authors have filed conflict of interest statements with the American Academy of Pediatrics. Any conflicts have been resolved through a process approved by the Board of Directors. The American Academy of Pediatrics has neither solicited nor accepted any commercial involvement in the development of the content of this publication.

All policy statements from the American Academy of Pediatrics automatically expire 5 years after publication unless reaffirmed, revised, or retired at or before that time.

1
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Use of influenza A (H1N1) 2009 monovalent vaccine: recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), 2009.
MMWR Recomm Rep.
2009
;
58
(RR-10):
1
–8
2
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Updated recommendation from the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) for revaccination of persons at prolonged increased risk for meningococcal disease.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep.
2009
;
58
(37):
1042
–1043
3
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Updated recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) regarding routine poliovirus vaccination.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep.
2009
;
58
(30):
829
–830