Background and Objective We developed a web-based continuing education course to assist clinicians to address issues related to communicating about developmental concerns and screening results with parents, and to better understand cultural considerations in this area of practice. Methods We conducted a randomized controlled trial which evaluated the web-based course (active), compared with a manualized PDF version of the materials. We hypothesized that participants in the active arm would be more likely to endorse adoption of core skills, and demonstrate greater gains in knowledge than those completing the manualized PDF version. We also hypothesized that participants who had not implemented developmental screening in their practice would indicate change in intention to adopt screening. Results Both groups showed significant improvement in knowledge (p < 0.001), although the magnitude of change was similar for both groups. 18 out of 98 participants reported a change along a continuum of increased intention to use developmental screening in their practice, and 21 out of 99 participants reported an increased likelihood of using specific terms such as “developmental delay” or “autism spectrum condition” with parents in initial conversations about developmental concerns. Conclusions Both the web-based and manualized PDF versions of the course improved knowledge. While no statistically significant difference between the arms was found, the significant increase in knowledge in both groups is important. The course also moved a subset of participants along the continuum toward using validated developmental screening methods in their practice.

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Outline of content of the CME Course

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Outline of content of the CME Course