Purpose: Despite the well-known benefits of breastfeeding, US rates of exclusive breastfeeding lag behind other developed nations. Without early and sustained primary care support, many mothers are likely to stop breastfeeding prematurely. Lactation Consultants (IBCLCs) can be very helpful in providing support for breastfeeding mother-baby dyads, however they are not always conveniently located for patients. Therefore, our objective was to develop and implement a pilot lactation training program for General Pediatrics faculty at an academic medical institution to enhance breastfeeding. As part of the program, we sought to assess changes in knowledge regarding breastfeeding before and after implementation. Methods: Volunteers were solicited from our 9 General Pediatrics clinics. A total of 26/46 General Pediatricians participated. The program started with a 2 hour didactic lecture on breastfeeding. Participants had 2 months to complete a 20 hour CME on line breast feeding course. Participants were given the opportunity to spend half a day shadowing an IBCLC in clinic. The final educational session consisted of practical information given by an IBCLC with case based discussions. (Figure 1). A survey was conducted both prior and after implementation of the program to assess knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding lactation issues. The survey was open to all General Pediatrics Faculty. Questions covered respondent comfort level dealing with issues such as technique and patient concerns (Table 1); respondents were asked to rank their response from strongly disagree (score=1) to strongly agree (score=5). Using unpaired t-tests, the mean responses for first set of questions were compared before and after the program was completed. Results: 25/26 of the original volunteers completed the program. There were 46 respondents to the survey prior to implementation and 41 respondents after implementation (Table 1); comparison of the responses prior and after implementation indicated improvement across some categories. Overall comfort with breastfeeding education and resources improved as did comfort assisting mother-baby dyads with some simple breastfeeding issues (sore nipples, engorgement). There was no change in comfort level with more complex breastfeeding issues (difficult latch, tongue tie, low milk supply, positioning, and sizing nipple shields). Conclusions: • There is a strong interest in lactation education amongst General Pediatrics Faculty. • Time commitment for faculty was minimal (4 hours of didactic time, 4 hours of clinic time and 20 hours of CME) and could easily fit into a busy Pediatrician’s schedule. • The Pilot was successful in improving comfort with simple breastfeeding issues but more education is needed surrounding more complicated problems. • Future versions of this program may benefit from more hands on education which could improve comfort level with more complex breast feeding issues. • This program established a need for more breastfeeding support and will result in establishment of more lactation clinics.

Figure 1

Lactation Champion Program Description

Figure 1

Lactation Champion Program Description

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Table 1

Survey Results