BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES:

Information on the use of prescription medications among children and adolescents in the United States is lacking. We estimate the prevalence of prescription medication use, concurrent use, and potential major drug–drug interactions (DDIs) in this population.

METHODS:

We conducted descriptive analyses using nationally representative data for people ≤19 years old from NHANES. Data were derived from a medication log administered by direct observation during in-home interviews. Acute medications were used for ≤30 days. Concurrent use was defined as use of ≥2 prescription medications. Micromedex was used to identify potentially major DDIs.

RESULTS:

During 2013–2014, 19.8% of children and adolescents used at least 1 prescription medication, and 7.1% used acute medications. Concurrent use of prescription medications was 7.5% overall and was highest among boys 6 to 12 years old (12%) and among boys and girls ages 13 to 19 years old (10% for both). Using pooled 2009–2014 data, we found that 8.2% of concurrent users of prescription medications were at risk for a potentially major DDI. The vast majority of interacting regimens involved antidepressants and were more common among adolescent girls than boys (18.1% vs 6.6%; P < .05), driven largely by greater rates of use of acute medications.

CONCLUSIONS:

Many US children and adolescents use prescription medications with nearly 1 in 12 concurrent users of prescription medications potentially at risk for a major DDI. Efforts to prevent adverse drug events in children and adolescents should consider the role of interacting drug combinations, especially among adolescent girls.

What’s Known on This Subject:

Adverse drug events remain a leading cause of death among children and adolescents in the United States. Current information on concurrent use of prescription medications, however, is lacking and can be used to better guide efforts to improve their safe use.

What This Study Adds:

One-fifth of children and adolescents regularly use prescription medications with nearly 1 in 12 concurrent users of prescription medications at risk for a major drug–drug interaction. Efforts to prevent adverse drug events should consider the role of interacting combinations.

Prescription medications are often indicated for the treatment of common pediatric and adolescent chronic conditions, such as depression and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder,1,3 and acute ailments, such as respiratory tract and sexually transmitted infections.4,5 In addition to known clinical benefits, many of these medications are associated with rare but serious adverse effects, such as serotonin syndrome, suicidal ideation, and sudden death.6,12 Despite the implementation of national programs focusing on medication safety in young children, adverse drug events remain a leading cause of injuries and death among both children and adolescents in the United States.13,16 Current data on the use and concurrent use of prescription medications can be used to better guide efforts to reduce the burden of adverse drug events in this vulnerable population.

Authors of several national studies have evaluated the use of prescription medications in younger populations.17,18 Despite important insights from these studies, however, they have several limitations. First, these previous studies have not been used to describe the concurrent use of specific types of acute and chronic prescription medications. This information is important because the use of multiple medications is associated with an increased risk for adverse drug events.19 Second, the authors of these studies do not provide information on the use of prescription medications among boys and girls separately for children and adolescents. This is important because of known differences in the use of specific drug classes between children and adolescents and between boys and girls. Finally, authors of previous studies do not examine the concurrent use of interacting drug regimens.

We used nationally representative, directly observed data from the most recent 6 cycles of the NHANES to examine the use of prescription medications among children and adolescents in the United States overall and stratified by age group and gender. We also examined the prevalence of potentially contraindicated or major drug–drug interactions (DDIs).

NHANES is a nationally representative survey sampled from the US civilian, noninstitutionalized population conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics. Sampling methods are described elsewhere.20 We restricted our sample to children and adolescents ages 0 to 19 years who responded to the prescription medication questionnaires. A parent or caregiver provided information for survey participants who were <16 years of age and for those who could not answer themselves. We used the 6 most recent NHANES cycles (2003–2004, 2005–2006, 2007–2008, 2009–2010, 2011–2012, and 2013–2014). A total of 23 179 children and adolescent participants ages 0 to 19 years were sampled over the 10-year period examined. Twenty-seven participants were excluded because of missing medication information, yielding an analytic subsample of 23 152 participants.

During the household interview participants were asked whether they had taken a prescription medication in the past 30 days.21 Those who answered “yes” were asked to show the interviewer the medication containers for all the medications used. If no container was available, the participant was asked to name the prescription medication they used. Prescription medication names and therapeutic classes were coded by using Lexicon Plus (Cerner Multum, Inc, Kansas City, MO), a proprietary database of Cerner Multum, Inc.

We differentiated acute versus chronic prescription medication use on the basis of duration of use. For each medication, participants were asked “How long was medication taken?” We defined acute use as the use of a prescription medicine for ≤30 days and all other use as chronic use. For prescription medications used chronically, approximately three-fourths (73%) were used for >365 days. We defined concurrent use as the simultaneous use of at least 2 prescription medications during the past 30 days. We also identified therapeutic classes most commonly used together, overall and by age group and gender.

We used Micromedex to identify potential DDIs for all prescription medications used in children and adolescents during 2013–2014. Micromedex defines contraindicated combinations as “drugs [that] are contraindicated for concurrent use” and major DDIs as “the interaction may be life threatening, require medical intervention to minimize or prevent serious adverse events, or both.”

We used descriptive statistics to estimate the prevalence of prescription medication and concurrent use for each of the 6 NHANES cycles examined. For analyses stratified by age group and gender, we focused on the most recent cycle (2013–2014); to increase sample size, however, we pooled the most recent 3 cycles (2009–2010, 2011–2012, and 2013–2014) for the analyses of commonly used combinations of therapeutic drug classes and DDIs. We used Taylor linearization methods to incorporate sample weights to adjust for the complex sampling methods in NHANES for estimate prevalence and conduct statistical tests. For most analyses, we used logistic regression to test for significance of differences by gender within age groups; to examine gender differences in the concurrent use of therapeutic drug classes and DDIs, the Pearson’s χ2 test was used. We tested for the statistical significance of trends across cycles using logistic regression. We used Stata (Stata Corp, College Station, TX) version 14 to perform all analyses. All P values reported are 2-sided. The study was considered exempt by a University of Illinois at Chicago Institutional Review Board.

Table 1 reports prevalence of the use of prescription medications overall and by population characteristics for 2013–2014. Nearly one-fifth (19.8%) of children and adolescents ≤19 years old used at least 1 prescription medication in the previous 30 days; 13.9% used chronic medications, and 7.1% used acute medications. Prescription medication use increased with age, ranging from 14.7% in children ages 0 to 5 years to 22.8% among adolescents (13–19 years). Acute medication use was highest in younger children (9.1%), whereas the use of chronic medications was lowest (6.4%).

TABLE 1

Prevalence of Prescription Medication Use in Previous 30 Days Among Children and Adolescents in the United States (2013–2014)

ParticipantsPrevalence of Use, % (95% CI)
n% (95% CI)Any MedicationAcute Medication, ≤30 dChronic Medication, >30 d
No. participants   786 299 528 
Overall 4404  19.8 (17.2–22.8) 7.1 (5.9–8.5) 13.9 (11.7–16.6) 
Age group, y      
 0–5 1603 25.9 (23.5–28.4) 14.7 (12.4–17.4)** 9.1 (7.6–10.8)* 6.4 (4.8–8.4)** 
 6–12 1563 37.6 (35.0–40.3) 21.0 (17.7–24.9) 5.5 (4.2–7.2) 16.5 (13.7–19.7) 
 13–19 1238 36.5 (33.6–39.4) 22.8 (18.0–28.4) 7.1 (5.0–10.0) 17.6 (13.5–22.7) 
Gender      
 Girl 2161 48.9 (46.3–51.4) 19.3 (16.0–23.2) 8.0 (6.0–10.6) 12.6 (9.7–16.4) 
 Boy 2243 51.1 (48.6–53.7) 20.3 (17.5–23.4) 6.3 (5.0–7.7) 15.2 (12.9–17.7) 
Asthma      
 Yes 413 9.7 (8.6–11.0) 58.5 (51.4–65.3)** 11.7 (8.1–16.6)* 51.9 (44.3–59.4)** 
 No 3577 90.3 (89.0–91.4) 15.9 (13.3–18.8) 6.4 (5.3–7.8) 10.3 (8.2–12.9) 
General health condition      
 Excellent 1882 43.9 (40.9–46.9) 12.8 (10.5–15.6)** 5.3 (4.1–6.8)* 7.9 (6.0–10.4)** 
 Very good 1209 29.0 (26.6–31.5) 21.1 (18.0–24.6) 7.5 (6.0–9.2) 14.9 (11.8–18.5) 
 Good 1054 21.8 (18.7–25.3) 27.1 (21.8–33.2) 8.7 (6.4–11.8) 20.9 (16.3–26.3) 
 Fair 226 4.6 (3.5–6.0) 39.0 (26.5–53.2) 14.0 (8.9–21.3) 27.4 (16.6–41.8) 
 Poor 33 0.7 (0.4–1.2) 56.1 (33.2–76.7) 11.5 (3.7–30.4) 50.3 (29.0–71.6) 
Race and/or ethnicity      
 Non-Hispanic white 1201 53.1 (42.6–63.4) 22.7 (18.2–27.8)* 8.0 (6.1–10.3) 16.3 (12.4–21.1)* 
 Non-Hispanic African American 1090 13.8 (9.8–19.1) 18.9 (15.1–23.5) 7.3 (5.2–10.1) 13.1 (10.5–16.2) 
 Hispanic or Latino 1414 23.0 (16.5–31.3) 16.2 (12.2–21.2) 6.3 (4.6–8.6) 10.6 (7.5–14.9) 
 Other 699 10.0 (8.1–12.4) 14.8 (11.6–18.7) 4.2 (2.7–6.4) 10.9 (8.5–13.9) 
Family income-to-poverty ratio, %      
 <130 2014 38.3 (31.2–45.9) 21.0 (17.4–25.2) 7.6 (5.8–10.1) 14.3 (11.8–17.3) 
 130–349 1257 33.8 (29.3–38.7) 21.3 (18.2–24.8) 7.5 (5.5–10.2) 14.9 (11.3–17.3) 
 >349 803 27.9 (21.2–35.7) 18.2 (15.3–21.6) 6.9 (5.2–9.2) 12.9 (10.6–17.3) 
Usual source of care      
 Yes 4138 94.0 (92.8–95.0) 20.5 (17.8–23.4)* 7.3 (6.1–8.8) 14.4 (12.0–17.2)** 
 No 266 6.0 (5.0–7.2) 10.1 (5.3–18.4) 3.4 (1.4–8.3) 6.7 (3.2–13.4) 
Insurance status      
 No insurance 350 8.1 (6.6–9.8) 6.5 (3.4–11.9)** 2.3 (1.0–5.2)** 4.5 (2.1–9.3)** 
 Public insurance only 2200 39.6 (33.3–46.2) 21.3 (18.0–25.0) 8.0 (5.9–10.7) 14.8 (12.1–17.9) 
 Any private insurance 1799 52.3 (45.5–59.1) 20.8 (17.5–24.6) 7.2 (5.9–8.7) 14.7 (11.6–18.6) 
ParticipantsPrevalence of Use, % (95% CI)
n% (95% CI)Any MedicationAcute Medication, ≤30 dChronic Medication, >30 d
No. participants   786 299 528 
Overall 4404  19.8 (17.2–22.8) 7.1 (5.9–8.5) 13.9 (11.7–16.6) 
Age group, y      
 0–5 1603 25.9 (23.5–28.4) 14.7 (12.4–17.4)** 9.1 (7.6–10.8)* 6.4 (4.8–8.4)** 
 6–12 1563 37.6 (35.0–40.3) 21.0 (17.7–24.9) 5.5 (4.2–7.2) 16.5 (13.7–19.7) 
 13–19 1238 36.5 (33.6–39.4) 22.8 (18.0–28.4) 7.1 (5.0–10.0) 17.6 (13.5–22.7) 
Gender      
 Girl 2161 48.9 (46.3–51.4) 19.3 (16.0–23.2) 8.0 (6.0–10.6) 12.6 (9.7–16.4) 
 Boy 2243 51.1 (48.6–53.7) 20.3 (17.5–23.4) 6.3 (5.0–7.7) 15.2 (12.9–17.7) 
Asthma      
 Yes 413 9.7 (8.6–11.0) 58.5 (51.4–65.3)** 11.7 (8.1–16.6)* 51.9 (44.3–59.4)** 
 No 3577 90.3 (89.0–91.4) 15.9 (13.3–18.8) 6.4 (5.3–7.8) 10.3 (8.2–12.9) 
General health condition      
 Excellent 1882 43.9 (40.9–46.9) 12.8 (10.5–15.6)** 5.3 (4.1–6.8)* 7.9 (6.0–10.4)** 
 Very good 1209 29.0 (26.6–31.5) 21.1 (18.0–24.6) 7.5 (6.0–9.2) 14.9 (11.8–18.5) 
 Good 1054 21.8 (18.7–25.3) 27.1 (21.8–33.2) 8.7 (6.4–11.8) 20.9 (16.3–26.3) 
 Fair 226 4.6 (3.5–6.0) 39.0 (26.5–53.2) 14.0 (8.9–21.3) 27.4 (16.6–41.8) 
 Poor 33 0.7 (0.4–1.2) 56.1 (33.2–76.7) 11.5 (3.7–30.4) 50.3 (29.0–71.6) 
Race and/or ethnicity      
 Non-Hispanic white 1201 53.1 (42.6–63.4) 22.7 (18.2–27.8)* 8.0 (6.1–10.3) 16.3 (12.4–21.1)* 
 Non-Hispanic African American 1090 13.8 (9.8–19.1) 18.9 (15.1–23.5) 7.3 (5.2–10.1) 13.1 (10.5–16.2) 
 Hispanic or Latino 1414 23.0 (16.5–31.3) 16.2 (12.2–21.2) 6.3 (4.6–8.6) 10.6 (7.5–14.9) 
 Other 699 10.0 (8.1–12.4) 14.8 (11.6–18.7) 4.2 (2.7–6.4) 10.9 (8.5–13.9) 
Family income-to-poverty ratio, %      
 <130 2014 38.3 (31.2–45.9) 21.0 (17.4–25.2) 7.6 (5.8–10.1) 14.3 (11.8–17.3) 
 130–349 1257 33.8 (29.3–38.7) 21.3 (18.2–24.8) 7.5 (5.5–10.2) 14.9 (11.3–17.3) 
 >349 803 27.9 (21.2–35.7) 18.2 (15.3–21.6) 6.9 (5.2–9.2) 12.9 (10.6–17.3) 
Usual source of care      
 Yes 4138 94.0 (92.8–95.0) 20.5 (17.8–23.4)* 7.3 (6.1–8.8) 14.4 (12.0–17.2)** 
 No 266 6.0 (5.0–7.2) 10.1 (5.3–18.4) 3.4 (1.4–8.3) 6.7 (3.2–13.4) 
Insurance status      
 No insurance 350 8.1 (6.6–9.8) 6.5 (3.4–11.9)** 2.3 (1.0–5.2)** 4.5 (2.1–9.3)** 
 Public insurance only 2200 39.6 (33.3–46.2) 21.3 (18.0–25.0) 8.0 (5.9–10.7) 14.8 (12.1–17.9) 
 Any private insurance 1799 52.3 (45.5–59.1) 20.8 (17.5–24.6) 7.2 (5.9–8.7) 14.7 (11.6–18.6) 

Estimates are weighted to account for differential probabilities of selection and differential nonresponse. Acute and chronic medication use are not mutually exclusive (eg, participants can use both types of prescription medications).

**

P < .01; * P < .05 by using χ2 to test for differences across respondent characteristics.

Figure 1 depicts the prevalence of the use of prescription medications over time (Fig 1A) and by age group and gender (Fig 1B). The most commonly used prescription medications included respiratory agents, especially bronchodilators (the most common type was albuterol) and psychotherapeutic agents, especially central nervous system (CNS) stimulants (methylphenidate was most common) and antidepressants (fluoxetine was most common) (Table 2). There was a notable decline in the use of acute medications between 2003–2004 and 2013–2014 (10.9% [95% confidence interval (CI), 9.3%–12.9%] to 7.1% [CI, 6.0%–8.4%]; P < .01), driven largely by a decrease in the use of antibiotics (7.9% [CI, 6.6%–9.5%] to 4.8% [CI, 3.7%–6.1%]; P < .01; Supplemental Table 5).

FIGURE 1

Weighted prevalence estimates of prescription medication use over time and by gender and age group among children and adolescents in the United States. Estimates are weighted to account for differential probabilities of selection and differential nonresponse. A, Trends in medication use (2003–2014). B, Medication use by gender and age (2013–2014). Boys ages 6 to 12 years report higher use of any prescription medication and chronic medications than girls (P < .01 and P < .01, respectively). Adolescent girls (13–19 years) report higher use of any prescription medication, including acute and chronic medications than adolescent boys (P < .01, P < .05, and P < .05, respectively).

FIGURE 1

Weighted prevalence estimates of prescription medication use over time and by gender and age group among children and adolescents in the United States. Estimates are weighted to account for differential probabilities of selection and differential nonresponse. A, Trends in medication use (2003–2014). B, Medication use by gender and age (2013–2014). Boys ages 6 to 12 years report higher use of any prescription medication and chronic medications than girls (P < .01 and P < .01, respectively). Adolescent girls (13–19 years) report higher use of any prescription medication, including acute and chronic medications than adolescent boys (P < .01, P < .05, and P < .05, respectively).

TABLE 2

Weighted Prevalence in the Use of Prescription Medications in the Previous 30 Days by Therapeutic Drug Class Among Children and Adolescents in the United States, Overall and by Gender and Age Group (2013–2014)

Prevalence of Use, % (95% CI)
Overall, n = 44040–5 y6–12 y13–19 y
Girls (n = 775)Boys (n = 828)Girls (n = 746)Boys (n = 817)Girls (n = 640)Boys (n = 598)
Respiratory agents 6.8 (5.8–8.0) 3.9 (2.3–6.6) 5.1 (3.3–7.8)** 5.7 (4.1–8.0) 11.5 (8.9–14.7)* 6.4 (4.2–9.7) 7.0 (4.9–9.9) 
 Bronchodilators 3.5 (3.0–4.1) 2.7 (1.5–4.7) 2.7 (1.5–4.8) 3.0 (1.7–5.5) 5.5 (4.3–6.9)* 3.4 (1.7–7.0)a 3.2 (2.1–5.0) 
  Albuterol 3.0 (2.5–3.6) 2.6 (1.5–4.5) 2.5 (1.4–4.5) 2.6 (1.4–4.8) 4.5 (3.1–6.6) 3.1 (1.4–6.9)a 2.6 (1.8–3.6) 
  Levalbuterol 0.3 (0.1–0.6)a 0.2 (0.0–1.5)a 0.2 (0.0–0.8)a 0.4 (0.1–2.5)a 0.4 (0.2–1.0)a 0.1 (0.0–1.0)ᵃ 0.2 (0.1–1.1)a 
  Fluticasone and salmeterol 0.1 (0.1–0.3)a 0.0 0.1 (0.0–0.8)a 0.0 0.4 (0.2–0.8)a 0.3 (0.1–1.5)a 0.0 
 Antihistamines 1.8 (1.3–2.6) 0.9 (0.3–2.6)a 1.4 (0.7–2.7)a 2.1 (1.1–4.0)a 3.2 (2.1–5.0) 1.0 (0.7–1.7) 2.0 (0.8–5.0)a 
  Cetirizine 1.0 (0.6–1.6) 0.9 (0.3–2.6)a 0.8 (0.5–1.4) 0.9 (0.4–2.3)a 1.3 (0.7–2.4) 0.7 (0.4–1.4)a 1.2 (0.3–4.2)a 
  Loratadine 0.4 (0.3–0.7) 0.0 0.1 (0.0–0.7)a 0.3 (0.1–1.4)a 1.2 (0.7–2.0) 0.1 (0.0–0.6)a 0.7 (0.2–2.8)a 
  Cyproheptadine 0.2 (0.1–0.6)a 0.0 0.1 (0.0–0.9)a 0.0 0.8 (0.2–2.7)a 0.1 (0.0–1.0)a 0.0 
 Leukotriene modifiers 1.7 (1.3–2.2) 0.3 (0.1–1.0)a 0.8 (0.4–1.7)a** 0.9 (0.4–1.9)a 4.0 (2.5–6.4)** 1.9 (1.1–3.1) 1.8 (0.8–3.7)a 
  Montelukast 1.7 (1.3–2.2) 0.3 (0.1–1.0)a 0.8 (0.4–1.7)a** 0.9 (0.4–1.9)a 4.0 (2.5–6.4)** 1.9 (1.1–3.1) 1.8 (0.8–3.7)a 
 Respiratory inhalant products 1.3 (0.8–1.9) 0.4 (0.1–1.5)a 1.3 (0.6–3.0)a 1.0 (0.4–2.4)a 3.1 (2.1–4.5) 0.2 (0.0–1.0)a 1.4 (0.5–3.7)a 
  Beclomethasone 0.5 (0.3–0.9) 0.1 (0.0–0.6)a 0.7 (0.2–2.4)a 0.4 (0.1–1.1)a 1.2 (0.5–2.4)a0.1 (0.0–1.0)a 0.6 (0.1–3.1)a 
  Fluticasone 0.7 (0.4–1.2) 0.3 (0.1–1.1)a 0.6 (0.2–1.9)a 0.6 (0.2–1.6)a 1.6 (0.9–2.7) 0.1 (0.0–0.7)a 0.7 (0.2–2.8)a 
Psychotherapeutic agentsb 5.0 (4.0–6.3) 0.1 (0.0–0.6)a 1.5 (0.5–5.0)a 3.5 (1.8–6.7)a 10.9 (8.7–13.6)** 6.4 (4.1–9.9) 5.7 (3.4–9.5) 
 CNS stimulants 3.3 (2.5–4.4) 0.1 (0.0–0.6)a 1.1 (0.3–4.3)a 2.2 (1.2–4.1) 9.4 (7.2–12.0)** 1.6 (0.9–3.0) 4.3 (2.3–7.9)** 
  Methylphenidate 1.6 (1.0–2.4) 0.1 (0.0–0.6)a 0.2 (0.0–1.5)a 0.5 (0.1–2.5)a 5.2 (3.2–8.3)** 0.8 (0.2–2.9)a 1.8 (0.8–3.9)a 
  Lisdexamfetamine 0.7 (0.5–1.0) 0.0 0.0 0.8 (0.2–2.8)a 1.7 (1.0–3.2) 0.1 (0.0–1.0)a 1.1 (0.4–2.8)a 
  Amphetamine and dextroamphetamine 0.4 (0.2–0.9)a 0.0 0.6 (0.1–5.1)a 0.3 (0.1–1.5)a 0.9 (0.4–2.0)a 0.3 (0.1–1.0)a 0.4 (0.1–2.1)a 
 Antidepressants 1.2 (0.7–2.0) 0.0 0.0 0.1 (0.0–0.7)a 1.3 (0.5–3.5)a3.8 (1.9–7.6)a 1.3 (0.5–3.7)a** 
  Fluoxetine 0.3 (0.2–0.6) 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.5 (0.2–1.6)a 0.7 (0.2–2.1)a 0.5 (0.2–1.6)a 
  Escitalopram 0.2 (0.1–0.9)a 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.8 (0.1–4.9)a 0.5 (0.1–3.9)a 
  Trazodone 0.2 (0.0–0.8)a 0.0 0.0 0.1 (0.0–0.7)a 0.0 0.9 (0.2–4.6)a 0.0 
 Antipsychotics 0.9 (0.7–1.1) 0.0 0.0 0.8 (0.3–2.7)a 1.9 (1.1–3.3)* 1.2 (0.6–2.5)a 1.1 (0.3–3.3)a 
  Aripiprazole 0.2 (0.1–0.5)a 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.5 (0.3–0.7) 0.4 (0.1–1.7)a 0.4 (0.1–3.3)a 
  Risperidone 0.4 (0.3–0.7) 0.0 0.0 0.8 (0.3–2.7)a 0.9 (0.3–3.1)a 0.1 (0.0–0.9)a 0.6 (0.2–2.5)a 
  Quetiapine 0.2 (0.1–0.4) 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.7 (0.4–1.1) 0.5 (0.2–1.9)a 0.0 
 Anticonvulsants 0.8 (0.3–1.9)a 0.0 0.2 (0.0–1.5)a 1.0 (0.3–3.6)a 0.4 (0.1–1.4)a 1.7 (0.5–5.6)a 1.2 (0.4–3.8)a 
  Topiramate 0.3 (0.1–1.1)a 0.0 0.2 (0.0–1.5)a 0.3 (0.2–0.5) 0.0 1.1 (0.2–6.7)a 0.3 (0.1–1.5)a 
  Lamotrigine 0.3 (0.1–0.9)a 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.9 (0.2–4.6)a 0.6 (0.1–3.4)a 
  Divalproex sodium 0.1 (0.0–0.5)a 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.2 (0.0–1.7)a 0.2 (0.0–1.3)a 0.2 (0.0–1.1)ᵃ 
 Anxiolytics, sedatives, and hypnotics 0.3 (0.2–0.4) 0.0 0.3 (0.0–2.4)a 0.2 (0.1–0.4)a 0.1 (0.0–0.4)a 0.8 (0.2–2.9)a 0.2 (0.0–1.2)a** 
  Hydroxyzine 0.2 (0.1–0.4) 0.0 0.3 (0.0–2.4)a 0.2 (0.1–0.4)a 0.1 (0.0–0.4)a 0.7 (0.2–3.1)a 0.1 (0.0–0.9)a 
Antibiotics 4.8 (3.7–6.2) 7.0 (5.2–9.4) 5.8 (4.5–7.4) 3.0 (1.6–5.6) 3.5 (2.0–6.1)* 6.6 (3.6–11.7) 3.5 (2.0–6.0)** 
 Penicillins 2.2 (1.6–3.0) 4.5 (3.3–6.1) 3.1 (2.2–4.4) 1.1 (0.5–2.6)a 1.4 (0.7–2.8)a 2.6 (1.1–6.0)a 1.1 (0.3–3.8)a** 
  Amoxicillin 1.8 (1.4–2.4) 4.4 (3.2–6.1) 2.9 (2.0–4.3) 0.6 (0.2–1.6)a 1.4 (0.7–2.8)a 1.1 (0.6–2.0) 1.1 (0.3–3.8)a 
 Macrolide derivatives 0.8 (0.5–1.4) 0.2 (0.0–1.0)a 1.0 (0.4–2.3)a 1.2 (0.4–3.8)a 1.4 (0.5–3.6)a 0.9 (0.3–2.8)a 0.2 (0.0–1.0)a
  Azithromycin 0.8 (0.5–1.2) 0.2 (0.0–1.0)a 0.9 (0.4–2.1)a 1.2 (0.4–3.8)a 1.4 (0.5–3.6)a 0.5 (0.1–2.9)a 0.2 (0.0–1.0)a 
 Cephalosporins 0.5 (0.2–1.3)a 0.7 (0.2–3.1)a 0.9 (0.3–2.7)a 0.2 (0.0–1.1)a 0.3 (0.0–2.3)a 0.6 (0.1–4.9)a 0.5 (0.1–2.8)a 
  Cefdinir 0.2 (0.1–0.6)a 0.2 (0.0–1.3)a 0.2 (0.1–0.8)a 0.1 (0.0–1.2)a 0.3 (0.0–2.3)a 0.0 0.4 (0.1–3.3)a 
Topical agents 3.0 (2.5–3.5) 1.2 (0.6–2.3) 1.7 (1.0–2.9) 1.9 (1.0–3.5) 4.9 (3.2–7.5) 3.7 (1.8–7.4)a 3.7 (1.7–8.0)a 
 Nasal preparations 1.5 (1.0–2.3) 0.1 (0.0–1.3)a 0.7 (0.3–1.5)a 0.5 (0.2–1.3)a 4.2 (2.5–7.1)** 0.8 (0.2–3.1)a 2.0 (0.7–5.5)a 
  Fluticasone nasal 1.0 (0.6–1.7) 0.0 0.3 (0.1–1.6)a 0.3 (0.1–1.2)a 2.4 (1.1–4.9)a0.6 (0.1–3.0)a 2.0 (0.7–5.5)a 
  Mometasone nasal 0.5 (0.2–0.9)a 0.1 (0.0–1.3)a 0.2 (0.0–1.4)a 0.1 (0.0–0.7)a 1.7 (0.7–4.3)a0.2 (0.0–2.0)a 0.2 (0.0–0.7)a 
 Dermatological agents 1.2 (0.7–1.9) 0.5 (0.2–1.2)a 0.6 (0.2–1.5)a 1.4 (0.7–3.0)a 0.7 (0.3–1.7)a** 2.8 (1.1–6.9)a 0.9 (0.2–3.1)a 
  Tretinoin topical 0.2 (0.1–0.7)a 0.0 0.0 0.1 (0.0–1.0)a 0.0 0.7 (0.1–4.4)a 0.3 (0.0–2.6)a 
Hormones or hormone modifiers 2.1 (1.5–2.8) 1.0 (0.5–2.1)a 1.1 (0.5–2.6)a** 1.2 (0.5–2.5)a 0.9 (0.2–3.3)a 7.2 (5.3–9.5) 0.7 (0.2–2.1)a** 
 Contraceptivesc 2.5 (1.8–3.5) 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 7.0 (5.2–9.3) 0.0 
  Ethinyl estradiol–norethindronec 0.9 (0.4–2.1)a 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 2.5 (1.1–5.6)a 0.0 
 Adrenal cortical steroids 0.6 (0.4–1.0) 1.0 (0.5–2.1)a 0.9 (0.4–2.2)a** 0.7 (0.2–2.4)a 0.4 (0.1–1.8)a 0.2 (0.0–1.0)a 0.6 (0.2–2.0)a** 
  Budesonide 0.3 (0.2–0.7)a 0.5 (0.2–1.6)a 0.4 (0.2–1.2)a 0.5 (0.1–2.6)a 0.4 (0.1–1.9)a 0.1 (0.0–1.0)a 0.1 (0.0–1.0)a 
Gastrointestinal agents 1.5 (0.8–2.6) 1.7 (1.0–3.0) 1.6 (0.9–2.6) 1.0 (0.4–2.7)a 1.4 (0.5–3.9)a 2.0 (0.8–4.9)a 1.3 (0.4–3.7)a** 
 PPIs 0.6 (0.3–1.3)a 0.2 (0.0–0.9)a 0.5 (0.2–1.3)a 0.1 (0.0–0.7)a 0.6 (0.1–2.8)a 1.1 (0.4–3.1)a 1.0 (0.2–4.6)a 
  Omeprazole 0.3 (0.1–1.2)a 0.1 (0.0–1.0)a 0.1 (0.0–0.6)a 0.1 (0.0–0.7)a 0.6 (0.1–2.8)a 0.1 (0.0–0.8)a 0.9 (0.2–4.8)a 
 H2 antagonist 0.5 (0.3–1.0)a 1.4 (0.7–3.1)a 1.0 (0.6–1.9) 0.5 (0.1–2.1)a 0.3 (0.1–1.2)a 0.2 (0.0–1.3)a 0.1 (0.0–0.8)a** 
  Ranitidine 0.5 (0.3–1.0)a 1.4 (0.6–3.1)a 1.0 (0.6–1.9) 0.5 (0.1–2.1)a 0.3 (0.1–1.2)a 0.2 (0.0–1.3)a 0.1 (0.0–0.8)a 
Antiadrenergic agents, centrally acting 1.1 (0.8–1.6) 0.0 0.2 (0.0–1.3)a 1.1 (0.3–3.5)a 3.3 (1.9–5.7)** 0.2 (0.0–1.9)a 1.4 (0.5–4.1)a** 
 Clonidine 0.8 (0.5–1.3) 0.0 0.2 (0.0–1.3)a 1.0 (0.3–3.5)a 2.1 (0.8–5.0)a 0.2 (0.0–1.9)a 0.9 (0.2–4.5)a 
 Guanfacine 0.4 (0.2–0.9)a 0.0 0.0 0.2 (0.0–0.8)a 1.5 (0.6–3.6)a** 0.0 0.5 (0.1–2.3)a 
Analgesics 1.1 (0.7–1.6) 0.2 (0.0–0.8)a 1.0 (0.4–2.3)a 0.6 (0.2–1.9)a 0.2 (0.0–0.7)a 3.2 (1.6–6.4)a 1.2 (0.6–2.3)a
 Nonsteroidal anti- inflammatory agents 0.7 (0.4–1.2) 0.2 (0.0–0.8)a 0.9 (0.4–2.2)a0.3 (0.1–1.1)a 0.0 1.8 (0.8–4.2)a 1.0 (0.5–2.2)a 
  Diclofenac 0.1 (0.0–0.8)a 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.6 (0.1–4.9)a 0.1 (0.0–0.7)a 
 Narcotics 0.4 (0.2–0.8) 0.0 0.1 (0.0–0.6)a0.5 (0.1–1.8)a 0.2 (0.0–0.7)a 1.5 (0.7–3.5)a 0.2 (0.0–0.9)a** 
  Hydrocodone 0.3 (0.2–0.7)a 0.0 0.1 (0.0–0.6)a 0.2 (0.0–1.0)a 0.1 (0.0–0.8)a 1.3 (0.5–3.4)a 0.2 (0.0–0.9)a 
  Oxycodone 0.2 (0.1–0.5)a 0.0 0.0 0.3 (0.0–2.2)a 0.0 0.8 (0.3–2.6)a 0.0 
Antiemetic agents 0.7 (0.5–1.1) 0.5 (0.1–1.6)a 1.1 (0.3–3.3)a 0.8 (0.3–2.4)a 0.2 (0.1–0.6)a 1.6 (0.8–3.3)a 0.1 (0.0–1.2)a 
 Ondansetron 0.5 (0.3–0.8) 0.1 (0.0–1.1)a 0.7 (0.2–2.8)a 0.5 (0.1–2.3)a 0.1 (0.0–0.5)a 1.1 (0.4–3.2)a 0.1 (0.0–1.2)a 
 Diphenhydramine 0.2 (0.1–0.3)a 0.2 (0.0–0.8)a 0.0 0.1 (0.0–1.2)a 0.2 (0.0–0.8)a 0.5 (0.2–1.6)a 0.0 
 Promethazine 0.1 (0.0–0.4)a 0.1 (0.0–0.9)a 0.4 (0.1–1.8)a0.1 (0.0–1.0)a 0.0 0.0 0.0 
Antidiabetic agents 0.5 (0.2–1.2)a 0.0 0.0 0.1 (0.0–0.7)a 1.3 (0.3–5.2)a 1.4 (0.5–3.7)a 0.1 (0.0–1.0)a 
 Metformin 0.2 (0.1–0.6)a 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.1 (0.0–0.4)a 1.1 (0.3–3.7)a 0.0 
 Insulin 0.3 (0.1–0.8)a 0.0 0.0 0.1 (0.0–0.7)a 1.2 (0.3–5.3)a0.3 (0.1–0.6)a 0.1 (0.0–1.0)a 
Prevalence of Use, % (95% CI)
Overall, n = 44040–5 y6–12 y13–19 y
Girls (n = 775)Boys (n = 828)Girls (n = 746)Boys (n = 817)Girls (n = 640)Boys (n = 598)
Respiratory agents 6.8 (5.8–8.0) 3.9 (2.3–6.6) 5.1 (3.3–7.8)** 5.7 (4.1–8.0) 11.5 (8.9–14.7)* 6.4 (4.2–9.7) 7.0 (4.9–9.9) 
 Bronchodilators 3.5 (3.0–4.1) 2.7 (1.5–4.7) 2.7 (1.5–4.8) 3.0 (1.7–5.5) 5.5 (4.3–6.9)* 3.4 (1.7–7.0)a 3.2 (2.1–5.0) 
  Albuterol 3.0 (2.5–3.6) 2.6 (1.5–4.5) 2.5 (1.4–4.5) 2.6 (1.4–4.8) 4.5 (3.1–6.6) 3.1 (1.4–6.9)a 2.6 (1.8–3.6) 
  Levalbuterol 0.3 (0.1–0.6)a 0.2 (0.0–1.5)a 0.2 (0.0–0.8)a 0.4 (0.1–2.5)a 0.4 (0.2–1.0)a 0.1 (0.0–1.0)ᵃ 0.2 (0.1–1.1)a 
  Fluticasone and salmeterol 0.1 (0.1–0.3)a 0.0 0.1 (0.0–0.8)a 0.0 0.4 (0.2–0.8)a 0.3 (0.1–1.5)a 0.0 
 Antihistamines 1.8 (1.3–2.6) 0.9 (0.3–2.6)a 1.4 (0.7–2.7)a 2.1 (1.1–4.0)a 3.2 (2.1–5.0) 1.0 (0.7–1.7) 2.0 (0.8–5.0)a 
  Cetirizine 1.0 (0.6–1.6) 0.9 (0.3–2.6)a 0.8 (0.5–1.4) 0.9 (0.4–2.3)a 1.3 (0.7–2.4) 0.7 (0.4–1.4)a 1.2 (0.3–4.2)a 
  Loratadine 0.4 (0.3–0.7) 0.0 0.1 (0.0–0.7)a 0.3 (0.1–1.4)a 1.2 (0.7–2.0) 0.1 (0.0–0.6)a 0.7 (0.2–2.8)a 
  Cyproheptadine 0.2 (0.1–0.6)a 0.0 0.1 (0.0–0.9)a 0.0 0.8 (0.2–2.7)a 0.1 (0.0–1.0)a 0.0 
 Leukotriene modifiers 1.7 (1.3–2.2) 0.3 (0.1–1.0)a 0.8 (0.4–1.7)a** 0.9 (0.4–1.9)a 4.0 (2.5–6.4)** 1.9 (1.1–3.1) 1.8 (0.8–3.7)a 
  Montelukast 1.7 (1.3–2.2) 0.3 (0.1–1.0)a 0.8 (0.4–1.7)a** 0.9 (0.4–1.9)a 4.0 (2.5–6.4)** 1.9 (1.1–3.1) 1.8 (0.8–3.7)a 
 Respiratory inhalant products 1.3 (0.8–1.9) 0.4 (0.1–1.5)a 1.3 (0.6–3.0)a 1.0 (0.4–2.4)a 3.1 (2.1–4.5) 0.2 (0.0–1.0)a 1.4 (0.5–3.7)a 
  Beclomethasone 0.5 (0.3–0.9) 0.1 (0.0–0.6)a 0.7 (0.2–2.4)a 0.4 (0.1–1.1)a 1.2 (0.5–2.4)a0.1 (0.0–1.0)a 0.6 (0.1–3.1)a 
  Fluticasone 0.7 (0.4–1.2) 0.3 (0.1–1.1)a 0.6 (0.2–1.9)a 0.6 (0.2–1.6)a 1.6 (0.9–2.7) 0.1 (0.0–0.7)a 0.7 (0.2–2.8)a 
Psychotherapeutic agentsb 5.0 (4.0–6.3) 0.1 (0.0–0.6)a 1.5 (0.5–5.0)a 3.5 (1.8–6.7)a 10.9 (8.7–13.6)** 6.4 (4.1–9.9) 5.7 (3.4–9.5) 
 CNS stimulants 3.3 (2.5–4.4) 0.1 (0.0–0.6)a 1.1 (0.3–4.3)a 2.2 (1.2–4.1) 9.4 (7.2–12.0)** 1.6 (0.9–3.0) 4.3 (2.3–7.9)** 
  Methylphenidate 1.6 (1.0–2.4) 0.1 (0.0–0.6)a 0.2 (0.0–1.5)a 0.5 (0.1–2.5)a 5.2 (3.2–8.3)** 0.8 (0.2–2.9)a 1.8 (0.8–3.9)a 
  Lisdexamfetamine 0.7 (0.5–1.0) 0.0 0.0 0.8 (0.2–2.8)a 1.7 (1.0–3.2) 0.1 (0.0–1.0)a 1.1 (0.4–2.8)a 
  Amphetamine and dextroamphetamine 0.4 (0.2–0.9)a 0.0 0.6 (0.1–5.1)a 0.3 (0.1–1.5)a 0.9 (0.4–2.0)a 0.3 (0.1–1.0)a 0.4 (0.1–2.1)a 
 Antidepressants 1.2 (0.7–2.0) 0.0 0.0 0.1 (0.0–0.7)a 1.3 (0.5–3.5)a3.8 (1.9–7.6)a 1.3 (0.5–3.7)a** 
  Fluoxetine 0.3 (0.2–0.6) 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.5 (0.2–1.6)a 0.7 (0.2–2.1)a 0.5 (0.2–1.6)a 
  Escitalopram 0.2 (0.1–0.9)a 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.8 (0.1–4.9)a 0.5 (0.1–3.9)a 
  Trazodone 0.2 (0.0–0.8)a 0.0 0.0 0.1 (0.0–0.7)a 0.0 0.9 (0.2–4.6)a 0.0 
 Antipsychotics 0.9 (0.7–1.1) 0.0 0.0 0.8 (0.3–2.7)a 1.9 (1.1–3.3)* 1.2 (0.6–2.5)a 1.1 (0.3–3.3)a 
  Aripiprazole 0.2 (0.1–0.5)a 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.5 (0.3–0.7) 0.4 (0.1–1.7)a 0.4 (0.1–3.3)a 
  Risperidone 0.4 (0.3–0.7) 0.0 0.0 0.8 (0.3–2.7)a 0.9 (0.3–3.1)a 0.1 (0.0–0.9)a 0.6 (0.2–2.5)a 
  Quetiapine 0.2 (0.1–0.4) 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.7 (0.4–1.1) 0.5 (0.2–1.9)a 0.0 
 Anticonvulsants 0.8 (0.3–1.9)a 0.0 0.2 (0.0–1.5)a 1.0 (0.3–3.6)a 0.4 (0.1–1.4)a 1.7 (0.5–5.6)a 1.2 (0.4–3.8)a 
  Topiramate 0.3 (0.1–1.1)a 0.0 0.2 (0.0–1.5)a 0.3 (0.2–0.5) 0.0 1.1 (0.2–6.7)a 0.3 (0.1–1.5)a 
  Lamotrigine 0.3 (0.1–0.9)a 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.9 (0.2–4.6)a 0.6 (0.1–3.4)a 
  Divalproex sodium 0.1 (0.0–0.5)a 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.2 (0.0–1.7)a 0.2 (0.0–1.3)a 0.2 (0.0–1.1)ᵃ 
 Anxiolytics, sedatives, and hypnotics 0.3 (0.2–0.4) 0.0 0.3 (0.0–2.4)a 0.2 (0.1–0.4)a 0.1 (0.0–0.4)a 0.8 (0.2–2.9)a 0.2 (0.0–1.2)a** 
  Hydroxyzine 0.2 (0.1–0.4) 0.0 0.3 (0.0–2.4)a 0.2 (0.1–0.4)a 0.1 (0.0–0.4)a 0.7 (0.2–3.1)a 0.1 (0.0–0.9)a 
Antibiotics 4.8 (3.7–6.2) 7.0 (5.2–9.4) 5.8 (4.5–7.4) 3.0 (1.6–5.6) 3.5 (2.0–6.1)* 6.6 (3.6–11.7) 3.5 (2.0–6.0)** 
 Penicillins 2.2 (1.6–3.0) 4.5 (3.3–6.1) 3.1 (2.2–4.4) 1.1 (0.5–2.6)a 1.4 (0.7–2.8)a 2.6 (1.1–6.0)a 1.1 (0.3–3.8)a** 
  Amoxicillin 1.8 (1.4–2.4) 4.4 (3.2–6.1) 2.9 (2.0–4.3) 0.6 (0.2–1.6)a 1.4 (0.7–2.8)a 1.1 (0.6–2.0) 1.1 (0.3–3.8)a 
 Macrolide derivatives 0.8 (0.5–1.4) 0.2 (0.0–1.0)a 1.0 (0.4–2.3)a 1.2 (0.4–3.8)a 1.4 (0.5–3.6)a 0.9 (0.3–2.8)a 0.2 (0.0–1.0)a
  Azithromycin 0.8 (0.5–1.2) 0.2 (0.0–1.0)a 0.9 (0.4–2.1)a 1.2 (0.4–3.8)a 1.4 (0.5–3.6)a 0.5 (0.1–2.9)a 0.2 (0.0–1.0)a 
 Cephalosporins 0.5 (0.2–1.3)a 0.7 (0.2–3.1)a 0.9 (0.3–2.7)a 0.2 (0.0–1.1)a 0.3 (0.0–2.3)a 0.6 (0.1–4.9)a 0.5 (0.1–2.8)a 
  Cefdinir 0.2 (0.1–0.6)a 0.2 (0.0–1.3)a 0.2 (0.1–0.8)a 0.1 (0.0–1.2)a 0.3 (0.0–2.3)a 0.0 0.4 (0.1–3.3)a 
Topical agents 3.0 (2.5–3.5) 1.2 (0.6–2.3) 1.7 (1.0–2.9) 1.9 (1.0–3.5) 4.9 (3.2–7.5) 3.7 (1.8–7.4)a 3.7 (1.7–8.0)a 
 Nasal preparations 1.5 (1.0–2.3) 0.1 (0.0–1.3)a 0.7 (0.3–1.5)a 0.5 (0.2–1.3)a 4.2 (2.5–7.1)** 0.8 (0.2–3.1)a 2.0 (0.7–5.5)a 
  Fluticasone nasal 1.0 (0.6–1.7) 0.0 0.3 (0.1–1.6)a 0.3 (0.1–1.2)a 2.4 (1.1–4.9)a0.6 (0.1–3.0)a 2.0 (0.7–5.5)a 
  Mometasone nasal 0.5 (0.2–0.9)a 0.1 (0.0–1.3)a 0.2 (0.0–1.4)a 0.1 (0.0–0.7)a 1.7 (0.7–4.3)a0.2 (0.0–2.0)a 0.2 (0.0–0.7)a 
 Dermatological agents 1.2 (0.7–1.9) 0.5 (0.2–1.2)a 0.6 (0.2–1.5)a 1.4 (0.7–3.0)a 0.7 (0.3–1.7)a** 2.8 (1.1–6.9)a 0.9 (0.2–3.1)a 
  Tretinoin topical 0.2 (0.1–0.7)a 0.0 0.0 0.1 (0.0–1.0)a 0.0 0.7 (0.1–4.4)a 0.3 (0.0–2.6)a 
Hormones or hormone modifiers 2.1 (1.5–2.8) 1.0 (0.5–2.1)a 1.1 (0.5–2.6)a** 1.2 (0.5–2.5)a 0.9 (0.2–3.3)a 7.2 (5.3–9.5) 0.7 (0.2–2.1)a** 
 Contraceptivesc 2.5 (1.8–3.5) 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 7.0 (5.2–9.3) 0.0 
  Ethinyl estradiol–norethindronec 0.9 (0.4–2.1)a 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 2.5 (1.1–5.6)a 0.0 
 Adrenal cortical steroids 0.6 (0.4–1.0) 1.0 (0.5–2.1)a 0.9 (0.4–2.2)a** 0.7 (0.2–2.4)a 0.4 (0.1–1.8)a 0.2 (0.0–1.0)a 0.6 (0.2–2.0)a** 
  Budesonide 0.3 (0.2–0.7)a 0.5 (0.2–1.6)a 0.4 (0.2–1.2)a 0.5 (0.1–2.6)a 0.4 (0.1–1.9)a 0.1 (0.0–1.0)a 0.1 (0.0–1.0)a 
Gastrointestinal agents 1.5 (0.8–2.6) 1.7 (1.0–3.0) 1.6 (0.9–2.6) 1.0 (0.4–2.7)a 1.4 (0.5–3.9)a 2.0 (0.8–4.9)a 1.3 (0.4–3.7)a** 
 PPIs 0.6 (0.3–1.3)a 0.2 (0.0–0.9)a 0.5 (0.2–1.3)a 0.1 (0.0–0.7)a 0.6 (0.1–2.8)a 1.1 (0.4–3.1)a 1.0 (0.2–4.6)a 
  Omeprazole 0.3 (0.1–1.2)a 0.1 (0.0–1.0)a 0.1 (0.0–0.6)a 0.1 (0.0–0.7)a 0.6 (0.1–2.8)a 0.1 (0.0–0.8)a 0.9 (0.2–4.8)a 
 H2 antagonist 0.5 (0.3–1.0)a 1.4 (0.7–3.1)a 1.0 (0.6–1.9) 0.5 (0.1–2.1)a 0.3 (0.1–1.2)a 0.2 (0.0–1.3)a 0.1 (0.0–0.8)a** 
  Ranitidine 0.5 (0.3–1.0)a 1.4 (0.6–3.1)a 1.0 (0.6–1.9) 0.5 (0.1–2.1)a 0.3 (0.1–1.2)a 0.2 (0.0–1.3)a 0.1 (0.0–0.8)a 
Antiadrenergic agents, centrally acting 1.1 (0.8–1.6) 0.0 0.2 (0.0–1.3)a 1.1 (0.3–3.5)a 3.3 (1.9–5.7)** 0.2 (0.0–1.9)a 1.4 (0.5–4.1)a** 
 Clonidine 0.8 (0.5–1.3) 0.0 0.2 (0.0–1.3)a 1.0 (0.3–3.5)a 2.1 (0.8–5.0)a 0.2 (0.0–1.9)a 0.9 (0.2–4.5)a 
 Guanfacine 0.4 (0.2–0.9)a 0.0 0.0 0.2 (0.0–0.8)a 1.5 (0.6–3.6)a** 0.0 0.5 (0.1–2.3)a 
Analgesics 1.1 (0.7–1.6) 0.2 (0.0–0.8)a 1.0 (0.4–2.3)a 0.6 (0.2–1.9)a 0.2 (0.0–0.7)a 3.2 (1.6–6.4)a 1.2 (0.6–2.3)a
 Nonsteroidal anti- inflammatory agents 0.7 (0.4–1.2) 0.2 (0.0–0.8)a 0.9 (0.4–2.2)a0.3 (0.1–1.1)a 0.0 1.8 (0.8–4.2)a 1.0 (0.5–2.2)a 
  Diclofenac 0.1 (0.0–0.8)a 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.6 (0.1–4.9)a 0.1 (0.0–0.7)a 
 Narcotics 0.4 (0.2–0.8) 0.0 0.1 (0.0–0.6)a0.5 (0.1–1.8)a 0.2 (0.0–0.7)a 1.5 (0.7–3.5)a 0.2 (0.0–0.9)a** 
  Hydrocodone 0.3 (0.2–0.7)a 0.0 0.1 (0.0–0.6)a 0.2 (0.0–1.0)a 0.1 (0.0–0.8)a 1.3 (0.5–3.4)a 0.2 (0.0–0.9)a 
  Oxycodone 0.2 (0.1–0.5)a 0.0 0.0 0.3 (0.0–2.2)a 0.0 0.8 (0.3–2.6)a 0.0 
Antiemetic agents 0.7 (0.5–1.1) 0.5 (0.1–1.6)a 1.1 (0.3–3.3)a 0.8 (0.3–2.4)a 0.2 (0.1–0.6)a 1.6 (0.8–3.3)a 0.1 (0.0–1.2)a 
 Ondansetron 0.5 (0.3–0.8) 0.1 (0.0–1.1)a 0.7 (0.2–2.8)a 0.5 (0.1–2.3)a 0.1 (0.0–0.5)a 1.1 (0.4–3.2)a 0.1 (0.0–1.2)a 
 Diphenhydramine 0.2 (0.1–0.3)a 0.2 (0.0–0.8)a 0.0 0.1 (0.0–1.2)a 0.2 (0.0–0.8)a 0.5 (0.2–1.6)a 0.0 
 Promethazine 0.1 (0.0–0.4)a 0.1 (0.0–0.9)a 0.4 (0.1–1.8)a0.1 (0.0–1.0)a 0.0 0.0 0.0 
Antidiabetic agents 0.5 (0.2–1.2)a 0.0 0.0 0.1 (0.0–0.7)a 1.3 (0.3–5.2)a 1.4 (0.5–3.7)a 0.1 (0.0–1.0)a 
 Metformin 0.2 (0.1–0.6)a 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.1 (0.0–0.4)a 1.1 (0.3–3.7)a 0.0 
 Insulin 0.3 (0.1–0.8)a 0.0 0.0 0.1 (0.0–0.7)a 1.2 (0.3–5.3)a0.3 (0.1–0.6)a 0.1 (0.0–1.0)a 

Estimates are weighted to account for differential probabilities of selection and differential nonresponse. H2, histamine2; PPI, proton pump inhibitors.

a

Estimates are unreliable; relative SE >30%.

b

Derived from Multum classification of psychotherapeutic agents, CNS stimulants, anticonvulsants, and anxiolytics, sedatives, and hypnotics.

c

Among girls only.

**

P < .01; * P < .05 by using logistic regressions to test differences between girls and boys.

The use of prescription medications was highest among adolescent girls (28.0% [CI, 21.3%–35.8%]) and boys ages 6 to 12 (26.5% [CI, 22.5%–30.9%]; Fig 1). Gender differences were also most pronounced in these 2 age groups. Among children ages 6 to 12, boys were nearly twice as likely to use prescription medications compared with girls (26.5% [CI, 22.5%–30.9%] vs 15.1% [CI, 11.8%–19.0%]; P < .01); this difference was primarily due to a higher rate of chronic medication use (22.3% [CI, 19.1%–25.9%] vs 10.1% [CI, 7.7%–13.0%]; P < .01), especially CNS stimulants (9.4% [CI, 7.2%–12.0%] vs 2.2% [CI, 1.2%–4.1%]; P < .01), α-adrenergic agonists (3.3% [CI, 1.9%–5.7%] vs 1.1% [CI, 0.3%–3.5%]; P < .01), and leukotriene modifiers (4.0% [CI, 2.5%–6.4%] vs 0.9% [CI, 0.4%–1.9%], respectively; P < .01) (Table 2).

During adolescence, however, girls were more likely to use prescription medications than boys; use was 28.0% (CI, 21.3%–35.8%) among girls versus 17.6% (CI, 13.3%–22.9%) among boys (P < .01). This difference was due to a higher rate of both acute (9.3% [CI, 5.9%–14.4%] vs 4.8% [CI, 3.2%–7.2%]; P < .05) and chronic (21.3% [CI, 15.0%–29.4%] vs 13.8% [CI, 10.2%–18.5%]; P < .05) medication use, specifically antidepressants (3.8% [CI, 1.9%–7.6%] vs 1.3% [CI, 0.5%–3.7%]; P < .01), antibiotics (6.6% [CI, 3.6%–11.7%] vs 3.5% [CI, 2.0%–6.0%]; P < .01), analgesics (3.2% [CI, 1.6%–6.4%] vs 1.2% [CI, 0.6%–2.3%]; P < .01), and antiemetics (1.6% [CI, 0.8%–3.3%] vs 0.1% [CI, 0.0%–1.2%]; P = .06) (Table 2). Rates of CNS stimulant use, in contrast, were lower in adolescent girls than in boys (1.6% [CI, 0.9%–3.0%] vs 4.3% [CI, 2.3%–7.9%]; P < .01).

Figure 2 depicts the prevalence of the use of concurrent prescription medications over time (Fig 2A) and by age group and gender (Fig 2B). During 2013 and 2014, 7.5% (CI, 6.6%–8.6%) of children and adolescents concurrently used prescription medications, a decrease from 2003–2004 (9.9% [CI, 9.1%–10.8%]; P < .01). The concurrent use of prescription medications varied across age groups for both boys and girls and was substantially more common among boys ages 6 to 12 than among girls in this age group (11.9% [CI, 8.8%–15.8%] vs 4.7% [CI, 3.4%–6.7%]; P < .01).

FIGURE 2

Weighted prevalence estimates of concurrent (≥2) prescription medication use over time and by gender and age group among children and adolescents in the United States. Estimates are weighted to account for differential probabilities of selection and differential nonresponse. A, Trends in concurrent medication use (2013–2014). B, Concurrent use by gender and age group (2013–2014). Boys ages 0 to 5 and 6 to 12 years report higher prevalence of concurrent medication use than girls (P = .05 and P < .05, respectively). a Prevalence of potential DDIs restricted to children who concurrently use ≥2 prescription medications; because of the small number of DDI cases, trend estimates are unstable.

FIGURE 2

Weighted prevalence estimates of concurrent (≥2) prescription medication use over time and by gender and age group among children and adolescents in the United States. Estimates are weighted to account for differential probabilities of selection and differential nonresponse. A, Trends in concurrent medication use (2013–2014). B, Concurrent use by gender and age group (2013–2014). Boys ages 0 to 5 and 6 to 12 years report higher prevalence of concurrent medication use than girls (P = .05 and P < .05, respectively). a Prevalence of potential DDIs restricted to children who concurrently use ≥2 prescription medications; because of the small number of DDI cases, trend estimates are unstable.

Among concurrent users of prescription medications, combinations that involved respiratory agents, such as bronchodilators and leukotriene modifiers, and psychotropic medications, including antidepressants, atypical antipsychotics, and CNS stimulants, were the most prevalent (Table 3). More than 20% (23.7% [CI, 11.1%–43.8%]) of boys ages 6 to 12 and more than half (57.9% [CI, 35.1%–77.7%]) of adolescent boys who used CNS stimulants concurrently used ≥2 other psychotropic medications. Combinations that involved antidepressants were most prevalent among adolescent girls; among these antidepressant users, 51.2% [CI, 19.4%–82.6%] were concurrently using at least 2 psychotropic medications.

TABLE 3

Most Common Prescription Medication Combinations Used Among Children and Adolescents Concurrently Using Prescription Medications Overall and by Gender and Age Group in the United States (2009–2014)

Prevalence of Combinations, No. (%) [95% CI]
Overall, n = 9930–5 y6–12 y13–19 y
Girls (n = 112)Boys (n = 159)Girls (n = 156)Boys (n = 244)Girls (n = 170)Boys (n = 152)
Bronchodilators–respiratory inhalants 123 (10.5) [7.9–13.7] 12 (10.1) [5.1–19.3]a 21 (21.4) [13.0–33.1]* 24 (13.8) [6.6–26.6]a 38 (12.0) [8.1–17.4] 11 (3.5) [1.7–7.0]a 17 (9.2) [5.1–15.9]** 
Bronchodilators–leukotriene modifiers 99 (8.2) [6.3–10.4] 6 (4.6) [2.1–10.0]a 12 (6.6) [3.0–13.8]a 20 (8.9) [5.6–13.8] 36 (12.7) [8.4–18.6] 11 (6.6) [2.6–15.8]a 14 (6.7) [3.5–12.6]a 
Bronchodilators–adrenal cortical steroids 96 (6.9) [5.1–9.2] 24 (15.8) [10.1–23.9] 29 (13.8) [8.0–22.7] 14 (10.4) [4.6–21.8]a 18 (4.4) [2.7–7.2]** 6 (3.1) [1.1–8.3]a 5 (5.1) [2.0–12.1]a 
CNS stimulants–α adrenergic blockers 54 (5.4) [3.7–7.7] 0 (0.0) 1 (0.4) [0.1–3.4]a 8 (4.1) [1.8–9.2]a 33 (13.8) [8.5–21.5]*** 0 (0.0) 12 (8.7) [4.5–16.1]a*** 
Bronchodilators–nasal preparations 56 (5.3) [3.6–7.7] 1 (0.9) [0.1–6.5]a 7 (4.6) [1.8–11.5]a9 (3.5) [1.6–7.6]a 25 (9.1) [5.4–14.9]* 5 (3.2) [0.7–13.0]a 9 (6.7) [3.2–13.7]a 
Leukotriene modifiers–nasal preparations 47 (4.9) [3.2–7.3] 0 (0.0) 4 (2.4) [0.9–6.3]a 11 (6.8) [3.1–14.3]a 21 (8.9) [5.5–14.1] 2 (2.5) [0.4–14.0]a 9 (5.2) [2.3–11.6]a 
Bronchodilators–antihistamines 50 (3.7) [2.6–5.1] 5 (4.2) [1.6–10.6]a 4 (2.0) [0.7–6.0]a 12 (6.1) [3.6–10.1] 18 (5.7) [3.2–9.9] 5 (2.3) [0.8–6.3]a 6 (2.5) [1.2–5.0]a 
CNS stimulants–atypical antipsychotics 38 (3.5) [2.3–5.2] 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 5 (4.8) [2.1–10.4]a 24 (8.2) [4.8–13.9] 2 (0.6) [0.1–2.5]a 7 (4.5) [1.8–10.6]a*** 
Nasal preparations–antihistamines 35 (3.4) [2.3–5.1] 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 6 (3.0) [1.5–5.7]a 20 (8.2) [4.8–13.6] 2 (0.6) [0.1–2.8]a 7 (5.3) [2.5–11.0]a*** 
CNS stimulants–antidepressants 33 (3.4) [2.1–5.6] 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 7 (3.6) [1.4–8.5]a 13 (5.4) [2.8–10.1]a 6 (2.5) [0.7–8.3]a 7 (5.6) [2.0–14.8]a 
Leukotriene modifiers–respiratory inhalants 42 (3.0) [2.1–4.4] 3 (2.1) [0.6–6.8]a 5 (2.7) [1.1–6.5]a 6 (2.4) [0.9–6.2]a 19 (6.9) [3.8–12.5]** 4 (1.0) [0.3–2.8]a 5 (2.3) [0.9–5.5]a 
Atypical antipsychotic–α adrenergic blockers 23 (2.6) [1.7–4.1] 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 2 (2.3) [0.5–10.8]a 15 (7.2) [4.0–12.5] 1 (0.7) [0.1–4.7]a 5 (2.9) [1.0–8.0]a 
CNS stimulants–antihistamines 24 (2.5) [1.3–4.6]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 7 (4.2) [1.7–10.2]a 13 (7.5) [3.5–15.4]a 2 (0.4) [0.1–3.1]a 2 (0.6) [0.1–2.9]a 
Bronchodilators–penicillins 38 (2.4) [1.6–3.5] 16 (12.0) [7.2–19.4] 12 (6.0) [3.2–10.9]a5 (1.9) [0.7–5.6]a 3 (0.7) [0.2–2.2]a 1 (1.3) [0.2–9.1]a 1 (0.4) [0.1–3.2]a 
Bronchodilators–CNS stimulants 26 (2.3) [1.4–3.9] 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 8 (4.2) [1.7–9.8]a 12 (3.2) [1.9–5.4] 1 (1.9) [0.3–12.9]a 5 (2.8) [0.8–8.9]a 
Antidepressants–anticonvulsants 11 (1.8) [0.8–4.4]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 2 (3.0) [0.7–12.3]a 2 (0.5) [0.1–2.1]a5 (3.5) [0.8–14.0]a 2 (2.1) [0.4–9.6]a 
Respiratory inhalants–adrenal cortical steroids 14 (1.7) [0.8–3.6]a 2 (1.7) [0.4–7.1]a 2 (1.7) [0.4–7.1]a 4 (4.6) [1.0–18.7]a 3 (0.9) [0.3–2.9]a2 (0.9) [0.2–4.1]a 1 (1.6) [0.2–11.0]a 
CNS stimulants–penicillins 22 (1.6) [0.9–3.0] 6 (4.9) [1.8–12.4]a 5 (2.3) [0.9–5.8]a 4 (1.9) [0.7–5.1]a 3 (1.3) [0.4–4.0]a 3 (1.7) [0.4–7.4]a 1 (0.4) [0.0–2.9]a 
Narcotic analgesics–NSAIDs 13 (1.6) [0.7–3.6]a 0 (0.0) 1 (0.2) [0.0–1.7]a 2 (1.0) [0.2–4.4]a 0 (0.0) 5 (2.4) [0.7–7.7]a 5 (4.2) [1.3–13.1]a 
Contraceptives–antidepressantsb 6 (2.9) [1.2–7.0]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 6 (5.3) [2.2–12.0]a 0 (0.0) 
Adrenal cortical steroids–leukotriene modifiers 22 (1.3) [0.8–2.2] 3 (1.9) [0.6–5.8]a 7 (3.9) [1.5–9.6]a 3 (1.1) [0.3–3.4]a 5 (1.3) [0.4–3.5]a 3 (0.9) [0.3–3.1]a 1 (0.3) [0.0–2.5]a 
Bronchodilators–antidepressants 8 (1.3) [0.5–3.1]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 3 (0.6) [0.2–2.1]a 4 (4.0) [1.3–11.2]a 1 (0.6) [0.1–4.7]a
Narcotic analgesics–penicillins 11 (1.2) [0.6–2.5]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 1 (0.4) [0.0–2.6]a 2 (0.7) [0.2–3.0]a 6 (3.3) [1.2–8.8]a 2 (0.8) [0.2–3.2]a
Adrenal cortical steroids–penicillins 12 (1.1) [0.5–2.3]a 2 (1.0) [0.2–4.0]a 5 (3.6) [1.4–9.4]a 1 (0.3) [0.0–2.1]a 2 (0.7) [0.2–2.8]a 2 (1.6) [0.3–8.3]a 0 (0.0) 
Bronchodilators–NSAIDs 13 (1.1) [0.6–1.9] 1 (1.4) [0.2–9.3]a 5 (3.0) [0.9–9.5]a 1 (0.6) [0.1–4.8]a 0 (0.0) 3 (1.3) [0.4–4.7]a 3 (1.0) [0.3–3.3]a 
Penicillins–macrolides 5 (1.0) [0.2–4.2]a 2 (6.0) [0.9–30.5]a 1 (2.7) [0.4–16.7]a*** 1 (1.1) [0.1–8.3]a 0 (0.0) 1 (0.5) [0.1–3.2]a 0 (0.0) 
Antidepressants–PPIs 5 (1.0) [0.3–3.1]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 1 (0.7) [0.1–5.0]a 1 (0.2) [0.0–1.5]a 3 (3.3) [0.9–11.4]a 0 (0.0) 
Contraceptives–dermatological agentsb 3 (2.1) [0.6–7.0]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 3 (3.7) [1.1–12.0]a 0 (0.0) 
Penicillins–nasal preparations 6 (0.8) [0.3–2.4]a 1 (5.6) [0.7–31.8]a 0 (0.0) 3 (2.0) [0.4–8.5]a 2 (0.8) [0.2–3.2]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 
Macrolides–nasal preparations 5 (0.6) [0.2–2.3]a 1 (5.6) [0.7–31.8]a 1 (0.3) [0.0–2.4]a** 0 (0.0) 2 (0.5) [0.1–2.0]a 1 (0.4) [0.0–2.8]a 0 (0.0) 
Bronchodilators–cephalosporins 6 (0.6) [0.2–1.5]a 1 (1.0) [0.1–7.6]a 4 (3.9) [1.2–11.8]a 0 (0.0) 1 (0.2) [0.0–1.6]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 
Penicillins–cephalosporins 4 (0.5) [0.2–1.5]a 2 (3.6) [0.6–18.5]a 2 (2.1) [0.5–8.0]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 
Prevalence of Combinations, No. (%) [95% CI]
Overall, n = 9930–5 y6–12 y13–19 y
Girls (n = 112)Boys (n = 159)Girls (n = 156)Boys (n = 244)Girls (n = 170)Boys (n = 152)
Bronchodilators–respiratory inhalants 123 (10.5) [7.9–13.7] 12 (10.1) [5.1–19.3]a 21 (21.4) [13.0–33.1]* 24 (13.8) [6.6–26.6]a 38 (12.0) [8.1–17.4] 11 (3.5) [1.7–7.0]a 17 (9.2) [5.1–15.9]** 
Bronchodilators–leukotriene modifiers 99 (8.2) [6.3–10.4] 6 (4.6) [2.1–10.0]a 12 (6.6) [3.0–13.8]a 20 (8.9) [5.6–13.8] 36 (12.7) [8.4–18.6] 11 (6.6) [2.6–15.8]a 14 (6.7) [3.5–12.6]a 
Bronchodilators–adrenal cortical steroids 96 (6.9) [5.1–9.2] 24 (15.8) [10.1–23.9] 29 (13.8) [8.0–22.7] 14 (10.4) [4.6–21.8]a 18 (4.4) [2.7–7.2]** 6 (3.1) [1.1–8.3]a 5 (5.1) [2.0–12.1]a 
CNS stimulants–α adrenergic blockers 54 (5.4) [3.7–7.7] 0 (0.0) 1 (0.4) [0.1–3.4]a 8 (4.1) [1.8–9.2]a 33 (13.8) [8.5–21.5]*** 0 (0.0) 12 (8.7) [4.5–16.1]a*** 
Bronchodilators–nasal preparations 56 (5.3) [3.6–7.7] 1 (0.9) [0.1–6.5]a 7 (4.6) [1.8–11.5]a9 (3.5) [1.6–7.6]a 25 (9.1) [5.4–14.9]* 5 (3.2) [0.7–13.0]a 9 (6.7) [3.2–13.7]a 
Leukotriene modifiers–nasal preparations 47 (4.9) [3.2–7.3] 0 (0.0) 4 (2.4) [0.9–6.3]a 11 (6.8) [3.1–14.3]a 21 (8.9) [5.5–14.1] 2 (2.5) [0.4–14.0]a 9 (5.2) [2.3–11.6]a 
Bronchodilators–antihistamines 50 (3.7) [2.6–5.1] 5 (4.2) [1.6–10.6]a 4 (2.0) [0.7–6.0]a 12 (6.1) [3.6–10.1] 18 (5.7) [3.2–9.9] 5 (2.3) [0.8–6.3]a 6 (2.5) [1.2–5.0]a 
CNS stimulants–atypical antipsychotics 38 (3.5) [2.3–5.2] 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 5 (4.8) [2.1–10.4]a 24 (8.2) [4.8–13.9] 2 (0.6) [0.1–2.5]a 7 (4.5) [1.8–10.6]a*** 
Nasal preparations–antihistamines 35 (3.4) [2.3–5.1] 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 6 (3.0) [1.5–5.7]a 20 (8.2) [4.8–13.6] 2 (0.6) [0.1–2.8]a 7 (5.3) [2.5–11.0]a*** 
CNS stimulants–antidepressants 33 (3.4) [2.1–5.6] 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 7 (3.6) [1.4–8.5]a 13 (5.4) [2.8–10.1]a 6 (2.5) [0.7–8.3]a 7 (5.6) [2.0–14.8]a 
Leukotriene modifiers–respiratory inhalants 42 (3.0) [2.1–4.4] 3 (2.1) [0.6–6.8]a 5 (2.7) [1.1–6.5]a 6 (2.4) [0.9–6.2]a 19 (6.9) [3.8–12.5]** 4 (1.0) [0.3–2.8]a 5 (2.3) [0.9–5.5]a 
Atypical antipsychotic–α adrenergic blockers 23 (2.6) [1.7–4.1] 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 2 (2.3) [0.5–10.8]a 15 (7.2) [4.0–12.5] 1 (0.7) [0.1–4.7]a 5 (2.9) [1.0–8.0]a 
CNS stimulants–antihistamines 24 (2.5) [1.3–4.6]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 7 (4.2) [1.7–10.2]a 13 (7.5) [3.5–15.4]a 2 (0.4) [0.1–3.1]a 2 (0.6) [0.1–2.9]a 
Bronchodilators–penicillins 38 (2.4) [1.6–3.5] 16 (12.0) [7.2–19.4] 12 (6.0) [3.2–10.9]a5 (1.9) [0.7–5.6]a 3 (0.7) [0.2–2.2]a 1 (1.3) [0.2–9.1]a 1 (0.4) [0.1–3.2]a 
Bronchodilators–CNS stimulants 26 (2.3) [1.4–3.9] 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 8 (4.2) [1.7–9.8]a 12 (3.2) [1.9–5.4] 1 (1.9) [0.3–12.9]a 5 (2.8) [0.8–8.9]a 
Antidepressants–anticonvulsants 11 (1.8) [0.8–4.4]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 2 (3.0) [0.7–12.3]a 2 (0.5) [0.1–2.1]a5 (3.5) [0.8–14.0]a 2 (2.1) [0.4–9.6]a 
Respiratory inhalants–adrenal cortical steroids 14 (1.7) [0.8–3.6]a 2 (1.7) [0.4–7.1]a 2 (1.7) [0.4–7.1]a 4 (4.6) [1.0–18.7]a 3 (0.9) [0.3–2.9]a2 (0.9) [0.2–4.1]a 1 (1.6) [0.2–11.0]a 
CNS stimulants–penicillins 22 (1.6) [0.9–3.0] 6 (4.9) [1.8–12.4]a 5 (2.3) [0.9–5.8]a 4 (1.9) [0.7–5.1]a 3 (1.3) [0.4–4.0]a 3 (1.7) [0.4–7.4]a 1 (0.4) [0.0–2.9]a 
Narcotic analgesics–NSAIDs 13 (1.6) [0.7–3.6]a 0 (0.0) 1 (0.2) [0.0–1.7]a 2 (1.0) [0.2–4.4]a 0 (0.0) 5 (2.4) [0.7–7.7]a 5 (4.2) [1.3–13.1]a 
Contraceptives–antidepressantsb 6 (2.9) [1.2–7.0]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 6 (5.3) [2.2–12.0]a 0 (0.0) 
Adrenal cortical steroids–leukotriene modifiers 22 (1.3) [0.8–2.2] 3 (1.9) [0.6–5.8]a 7 (3.9) [1.5–9.6]a 3 (1.1) [0.3–3.4]a 5 (1.3) [0.4–3.5]a 3 (0.9) [0.3–3.1]a 1 (0.3) [0.0–2.5]a 
Bronchodilators–antidepressants 8 (1.3) [0.5–3.1]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 3 (0.6) [0.2–2.1]a 4 (4.0) [1.3–11.2]a 1 (0.6) [0.1–4.7]a
Narcotic analgesics–penicillins 11 (1.2) [0.6–2.5]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 1 (0.4) [0.0–2.6]a 2 (0.7) [0.2–3.0]a 6 (3.3) [1.2–8.8]a 2 (0.8) [0.2–3.2]a
Adrenal cortical steroids–penicillins 12 (1.1) [0.5–2.3]a 2 (1.0) [0.2–4.0]a 5 (3.6) [1.4–9.4]a 1 (0.3) [0.0–2.1]a 2 (0.7) [0.2–2.8]a 2 (1.6) [0.3–8.3]a 0 (0.0) 
Bronchodilators–NSAIDs 13 (1.1) [0.6–1.9] 1 (1.4) [0.2–9.3]a 5 (3.0) [0.9–9.5]a 1 (0.6) [0.1–4.8]a 0 (0.0) 3 (1.3) [0.4–4.7]a 3 (1.0) [0.3–3.3]a 
Penicillins–macrolides 5 (1.0) [0.2–4.2]a 2 (6.0) [0.9–30.5]a 1 (2.7) [0.4–16.7]a*** 1 (1.1) [0.1–8.3]a 0 (0.0) 1 (0.5) [0.1–3.2]a 0 (0.0) 
Antidepressants–PPIs 5 (1.0) [0.3–3.1]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 1 (0.7) [0.1–5.0]a 1 (0.2) [0.0–1.5]a 3 (3.3) [0.9–11.4]a 0 (0.0) 
Contraceptives–dermatological agentsb 3 (2.1) [0.6–7.0]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 3 (3.7) [1.1–12.0]a 0 (0.0) 
Penicillins–nasal preparations 6 (0.8) [0.3–2.4]a 1 (5.6) [0.7–31.8]a 0 (0.0) 3 (2.0) [0.4–8.5]a 2 (0.8) [0.2–3.2]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 
Macrolides–nasal preparations 5 (0.6) [0.2–2.3]a 1 (5.6) [0.7–31.8]a 1 (0.3) [0.0–2.4]a** 0 (0.0) 2 (0.5) [0.1–2.0]a 1 (0.4) [0.0–2.8]a 0 (0.0) 
Bronchodilators–cephalosporins 6 (0.6) [0.2–1.5]a 1 (1.0) [0.1–7.6]a 4 (3.9) [1.2–11.8]a 0 (0.0) 1 (0.2) [0.0–1.6]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 
Penicillins–cephalosporins 4 (0.5) [0.2–1.5]a 2 (3.6) [0.6–18.5]a 2 (2.1) [0.5–8.0]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 

Estimates are restricted to children who report the use of ≥2 prescription medications.

a

Estimates are unreliable; relative SE >30%.

b

Estimates are restricted to girls.

***

P < .01; ** P < .05; * P < .10 by using χ2 tests to determine differences between girls and boys.

Among concurrent users of ≥2 prescription medications during 2013–2014 (N = 301), a total of 156 unique prescription medications were used (Supplemental Table 6). Using Micromedex, a total of 826 potential DDIs (contraindicated [n = 29] or potentially major [n = 797]) for these 156 medications were identified. In the pooled 2003–2014 sample, 101 unique combinations of these potential DDIs were used by 158 people (Supplemental Table 7). In the pooled 2009–2014 sample, 63 unique DDI combinations were used by 78 people, making the overall rate 0.7% (CI, 0.5%–1.0%). We found only 1 individual using a contraindicated DDI (aripiprazole–metoclopramide).

Among concurrent users of prescription medications, 8.2% [CI, 6.0%–11.1%] were at risk for potential major DDIs (Table 4). Nearly half of interacting regimens used involved psychotropic agents, primarily antidepressants, the most common adverse interaction effect being QT prolongation. The majority (68.0% [CI, 55.9%–78.0%]) of these interacting regimens involved the use of at least 1 acute medication.

TABLE 4

Potentially Major DDIs Among Children and Adolescents Concurrently Using Prescription Medications Overall and by Gender and Age Group in the United States (2009–2014)

Prevalence of DDIs, No. (%) [95% CI]
Overall, n = 9930–5 y6–12 y13–19 yAdverse Interaction Effect
Girls (n = 112)Boys (n = 159)Girls (n = 156)Boys (n = 244)Girls (n = 170)Boys (n = 152)
Any major DDI 78 (8.2) [6.0–11.1] 4 (3.0) [1.0–8.2]a 6 (3.0) [1.0–8.6]a 7 (3.0) [1.2–7.0]a 19 (5.7) [3.3–9.6] 30 (18.1) [11.0–28.4] 12 (6.6) [3.6–30.2]a**  
 Psychotherapeutic agents 48 (5.6) [3.6–8.6] 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 5 (2.2) [0.9–5.0]a 14 (4.4) [2.3–8.2]a 20 (12.5) [6.2–23.6]a 9 (5.4) [2.5–37.0]a 
 Antidepressants 33 (3.9) [2.5–6.1] 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 5 (2.2) [0.9–5.0]a 7 (2.2) [1.0–5.2]a 15 (9.1) [4.9–16.1] 6 (3.9) [1.5–46.5]a  
 SSRIs 21 (2.3) [1.4–3.9] 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 3 (1.5) [0.4–3.0]a 2 (0.7) [0.2–2.8]a 11 (4.9) [2.2–10.6]a 5 (3.7) [1.3–49.4]a 
  Citalopram–omeprazoleb 1 (0.4) [0.1–3.2]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 1 (1.7) [0.2–11.5]a 0 (0.0) QT prolongation 
  Fluoxetine–trazodone 4 (0.4) [0.2–1.0]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 1 (0.4) [0.1–3.0]a 2 (0.8) [0.2–3.2]a 1 (0.5) [0.1–96.4]a QTprolongation and/or serotonin syndrome 
  Escitalopram– amphetamines 1 (0.3) [0.0–2.3]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 1 (1.6) [0.2–98.0]a Serotonin syndrome 
  Sertraline–amphetamines 3 (0.3) [0.1–0.9]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 1 (0.4) [0.1–1.0]a 0 (0.0) 1 (0.4) [0.1–2.7]a 1 (0.7) [0.1–100.0]a Serotonin syndrome 
  Escitalopram–hydroxyzineb 2 (0.2) [0.1–1.1]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 1 (0.3) [0.0–2.0]a 1 (0.7) [0.1–4.7]a 0 (0.0) QT prolongation 
  Sertraline–trazodone 2 (0.1) [0.0–0.5]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 2 (0.8) [0.2–2.0]a 0 (0.0)* 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) Serotonin syndrome 
  Fluoxetine–amphetamines 1 (0.1) [0.0–0.7]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 1 (0.7) [0.1–1.0]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) Serotonin syndrome 
 Tricyclics 8 (1.4) [0.6–3.3]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 3 (1.0) [0.2–4.3]a 5 (4.5) [1.6–11.8]a 0 (0.0)*  
  Amitriptyline–albuterolb 1 (0.3) [0.0–2.5]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 1 (1.3) [0.2–9.1]a 0 (0.0) Cardiovascular effects 
  Nortriptyline–ondansetronb 1 (0.3) [0.0–1.9]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 1 (1.0) [0.1–6.9]a 0 (0.0) QT prolongation 
  Imipramine–quetiapine 1 (0.2) [0.0–1.1]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 1 (0.7) [0.1–5.1]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) QT prolongation 
 Atypical antipsychotics 21 (1.8) [1.1–3.1] 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 9 (3.3) [1.4–7.4]a8 (2.8) [1.3–5.9]a 4 (1.9) [0.7–49.2]a  
  Quetiapine–aripiprazole 3 (0.3) [0.1–1.3]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 2 (0.8) [0.2–3.4]a 1 (0.4) [0.1–98.0]a QT prolongation 
  Risperidone–lithium 3 (0.3) [0.1–0.9]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 1 (0.3) [0.0–2.3]a 0 (0.0) 2 (1.1) [0.3–69.8]a Extrapyramidal symptoms 
  Quetiapine–trazodone 3 (0.2) [0.1–0.8]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 2 (0.5) [0.1–2.2]a 1 (0.5) [0.1–3.5]a 0 (0.0) QT prolongation 
  Quetiapine–risperidone 2 (0.2) [0.0–0.7]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 1 (0.5) [0.1–3.2]a 1 (0.3) [0.0–2.1]a 0 (0.0) QT prolongation 
  Risperidone–hydroxyzineb 2 (0.1) [0.0–0.7]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 2 (0.4) [0.1–3.1]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) QT prolongation 
 CNS stimulants 14 (1.7) [0.8–3.5]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 4 (1.8) [0.6–4.0]a 3 (1.0) [0.3–3.2]a 4 (2.8) [0.7–10.8]a 3 (2.5) [0.6–67.9]a  
  Atomoxetine–albuterolb 2 (0.6) [0.1–3.2]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 1 (0.5) [0.1–3.2]a 1 (1.9) [0.3–12.9]a 0 (0.0) Cardiovascular effects 
  Amphetamines–trazodone 4 (0.2) [0.1–0.6]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 2 (0.7) [0.2–2.0]a 2 (0.5) [0.1–2.2]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) Serotonin syndrome 
  Methylphenidate–bupropion 3 (0.2) [0.0–0.5]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 1 (0.4) [0.1–1.0]a 0 (0.0) 1 (0.2) [0.0–1.5]a 1 (0.2) [0.0–99.2]a Seizures 
Analgesics 11 (1.4) [0.5–3.4]a 0 (0.0) 2 (0.6) [0.1–2.4]a 0 (0.0) 1 (0.2) [0.0–1.3]a 8 (4.9) [1.8–12.6]a 0 (0.0)*  
 Narcotics 7 (0.8) [0.3–1.9]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 1 (0.2) [0.0–1.3]a 6 (3.0) [1.2–7.2]a 0 (0.0)*  
  Hydrocodoneb–oxycodoneb 2 (0.4) [0.1–1.7]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 2 (1.5) [0.4–6.5]a 0 (0.0) CNS depression 
  Hydrocodoneb–cyclobenzaprineb 2 (0.2) [0.1–0.9]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 2 (0.9) [0.2–3.5]a 0 (0.0) CNS depression 
 NSAIDs 4 (0.5) [0.1–2.5]a 0 (0.0) 2 (0.6) [0.1–2.4]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 2 (1.9) [0.3–9.6]a 0 (0.0)  
  Naproxenb–amitriptyline 1 (0.1) [0.0–0.6]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 1 (0.3) [0.0–2.3]a 0 (0.0) Bleeding 
Antiemetic or antibiotics 14 (1.6) [0.9–2.8] 0 (0.0) 1 (1.1) [0.2–7.9]a 1 (0.4) [0.1–1.0]a 2 (0.5) [0.1–2.0]a 7 (4.0) [1.7–9.4]a 3 (1.2) [0.4–58.8]a  
 Promethazineb–azithromycinb 3 (0.3) [0.1–1.1]a 0 (0.0) 1 (1.1) [0.2–7.9]a 1 (0.4) [0.1–1.0]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 1 (0.3) [0.0–99.4]a QT prolongation 
 Ondansetronb–erythromycin 2 (0.2) [0.0–0.7]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 2 (0.6) [0.1–2.6]a 0 (0.0) QT prolongation 
 Ondansetronb–clarithromycin 1 (0.1) [0.0–0.9]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 1 (0.5) [0.1–3.2]a 0 (0.0) QT prolongation 
Prevalence of DDIs, No. (%) [95% CI]
Overall, n = 9930–5 y6–12 y13–19 yAdverse Interaction Effect
Girls (n = 112)Boys (n = 159)Girls (n = 156)Boys (n = 244)Girls (n = 170)Boys (n = 152)
Any major DDI 78 (8.2) [6.0–11.1] 4 (3.0) [1.0–8.2]a 6 (3.0) [1.0–8.6]a 7 (3.0) [1.2–7.0]a 19 (5.7) [3.3–9.6] 30 (18.1) [11.0–28.4] 12 (6.6) [3.6–30.2]a**  
 Psychotherapeutic agents 48 (5.6) [3.6–8.6] 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 5 (2.2) [0.9–5.0]a 14 (4.4) [2.3–8.2]a 20 (12.5) [6.2–23.6]a 9 (5.4) [2.5–37.0]a 
 Antidepressants 33 (3.9) [2.5–6.1] 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 5 (2.2) [0.9–5.0]a 7 (2.2) [1.0–5.2]a 15 (9.1) [4.9–16.1] 6 (3.9) [1.5–46.5]a  
 SSRIs 21 (2.3) [1.4–3.9] 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 3 (1.5) [0.4–3.0]a 2 (0.7) [0.2–2.8]a 11 (4.9) [2.2–10.6]a 5 (3.7) [1.3–49.4]a 
  Citalopram–omeprazoleb 1 (0.4) [0.1–3.2]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 1 (1.7) [0.2–11.5]a 0 (0.0) QT prolongation 
  Fluoxetine–trazodone 4 (0.4) [0.2–1.0]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 1 (0.4) [0.1–3.0]a 2 (0.8) [0.2–3.2]a 1 (0.5) [0.1–96.4]a QTprolongation and/or serotonin syndrome 
  Escitalopram– amphetamines 1 (0.3) [0.0–2.3]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 1 (1.6) [0.2–98.0]a Serotonin syndrome 
  Sertraline–amphetamines 3 (0.3) [0.1–0.9]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 1 (0.4) [0.1–1.0]a 0 (0.0) 1 (0.4) [0.1–2.7]a 1 (0.7) [0.1–100.0]a Serotonin syndrome 
  Escitalopram–hydroxyzineb 2 (0.2) [0.1–1.1]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 1 (0.3) [0.0–2.0]a 1 (0.7) [0.1–4.7]a 0 (0.0) QT prolongation 
  Sertraline–trazodone 2 (0.1) [0.0–0.5]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 2 (0.8) [0.2–2.0]a 0 (0.0)* 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) Serotonin syndrome 
  Fluoxetine–amphetamines 1 (0.1) [0.0–0.7]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 1 (0.7) [0.1–1.0]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) Serotonin syndrome 
 Tricyclics 8 (1.4) [0.6–3.3]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 3 (1.0) [0.2–4.3]a 5 (4.5) [1.6–11.8]a 0 (0.0)*  
  Amitriptyline–albuterolb 1 (0.3) [0.0–2.5]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 1 (1.3) [0.2–9.1]a 0 (0.0) Cardiovascular effects 
  Nortriptyline–ondansetronb 1 (0.3) [0.0–1.9]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 1 (1.0) [0.1–6.9]a 0 (0.0) QT prolongation 
  Imipramine–quetiapine 1 (0.2) [0.0–1.1]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 1 (0.7) [0.1–5.1]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) QT prolongation 
 Atypical antipsychotics 21 (1.8) [1.1–3.1] 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 9 (3.3) [1.4–7.4]a8 (2.8) [1.3–5.9]a 4 (1.9) [0.7–49.2]a  
  Quetiapine–aripiprazole 3 (0.3) [0.1–1.3]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 2 (0.8) [0.2–3.4]a 1 (0.4) [0.1–98.0]a QT prolongation 
  Risperidone–lithium 3 (0.3) [0.1–0.9]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 1 (0.3) [0.0–2.3]a 0 (0.0) 2 (1.1) [0.3–69.8]a Extrapyramidal symptoms 
  Quetiapine–trazodone 3 (0.2) [0.1–0.8]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 2 (0.5) [0.1–2.2]a 1 (0.5) [0.1–3.5]a 0 (0.0) QT prolongation 
  Quetiapine–risperidone 2 (0.2) [0.0–0.7]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 1 (0.5) [0.1–3.2]a 1 (0.3) [0.0–2.1]a 0 (0.0) QT prolongation 
  Risperidone–hydroxyzineb 2 (0.1) [0.0–0.7]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 2 (0.4) [0.1–3.1]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) QT prolongation 
 CNS stimulants 14 (1.7) [0.8–3.5]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 4 (1.8) [0.6–4.0]a 3 (1.0) [0.3–3.2]a 4 (2.8) [0.7–10.8]a 3 (2.5) [0.6–67.9]a  
  Atomoxetine–albuterolb 2 (0.6) [0.1–3.2]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 1 (0.5) [0.1–3.2]a 1 (1.9) [0.3–12.9]a 0 (0.0) Cardiovascular effects 
  Amphetamines–trazodone 4 (0.2) [0.1–0.6]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 2 (0.7) [0.2–2.0]a 2 (0.5) [0.1–2.2]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) Serotonin syndrome 
  Methylphenidate–bupropion 3 (0.2) [0.0–0.5]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 1 (0.4) [0.1–1.0]a 0 (0.0) 1 (0.2) [0.0–1.5]a 1 (0.2) [0.0–99.2]a Seizures 
Analgesics 11 (1.4) [0.5–3.4]a 0 (0.0) 2 (0.6) [0.1–2.4]a 0 (0.0) 1 (0.2) [0.0–1.3]a 8 (4.9) [1.8–12.6]a 0 (0.0)*  
 Narcotics 7 (0.8) [0.3–1.9]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 1 (0.2) [0.0–1.3]a 6 (3.0) [1.2–7.2]a 0 (0.0)*  
  Hydrocodoneb–oxycodoneb 2 (0.4) [0.1–1.7]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 2 (1.5) [0.4–6.5]a 0 (0.0) CNS depression 
  Hydrocodoneb–cyclobenzaprineb 2 (0.2) [0.1–0.9]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 2 (0.9) [0.2–3.5]a 0 (0.0) CNS depression 
 NSAIDs 4 (0.5) [0.1–2.5]a 0 (0.0) 2 (0.6) [0.1–2.4]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 2 (1.9) [0.3–9.6]a 0 (0.0)  
  Naproxenb–amitriptyline 1 (0.1) [0.0–0.6]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 1 (0.3) [0.0–2.3]a 0 (0.0) Bleeding 
Antiemetic or antibiotics 14 (1.6) [0.9–2.8] 0 (0.0) 1 (1.1) [0.2–7.9]a 1 (0.4) [0.1–1.0]a 2 (0.5) [0.1–2.0]a 7 (4.0) [1.7–9.4]a 3 (1.2) [0.4–58.8]a  
 Promethazineb–azithromycinb 3 (0.3) [0.1–1.1]a 0 (0.0) 1 (1.1) [0.2–7.9]a 1 (0.4) [0.1–1.0]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 1 (0.3) [0.0–99.4]a QT prolongation 
 Ondansetronb–erythromycin 2 (0.2) [0.0–0.7]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 2 (0.6) [0.1–2.6]a 0 (0.0) QT prolongation 
 Ondansetronb–clarithromycin 1 (0.1) [0.0–0.9]a 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 1 (0.5) [0.1–3.2]a 0 (0.0) QT prolongation 

Estimates are weighted to account for differential probabilities of selection and differential nonresponse. Micromedex was used to determine potential contraindicated and major DDIs among all medications used by children or adolescents who report using ≥2 medications during 2013–2014 (with Supplemental Table 6, we provide a list of these medications, and with Supplemental Table 7 , we provide a list of all DDIs found). Aripiprazole–metoclopramide is considered a contraindicated DDI; all other DDIs were considered potentially major DDIs. DDI, contraindicated or major DDI; SSRI, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor.

a

Estimates are unreliable; relative SE >30%.

b

Acute medications (used ≤30 days).

**

P < .05; * P < .10 by using χ2 tests to determine differences between girls and boys.

The use of combinations with potential major DDIs was higher among adolescent girls (18.1% [CI, 11.0%–28.4%]) than among boys (6.6% [CI, 3.6%–11.9%], P < .05). This difference was largely due to the disproportionate use of tricyclic antidepressants in interacting combinations that involved acute medications, specifically nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (most commonly diclofenac–amitriptyline), antiemetics (ondansetron–nortriptyline), and albuterol (albuterol–amitriptyline) by adolescent girls. Atypical antipsychotics accounted for the vast majority of interacting drug combinations in boys ages 6 to 12, whereas antidepressants accounted for the majority in adolescent boys.

Whereas overall prevalence of potential major DDIs among concurrent users of prescription medications is similar to that reported during 2003–2008 (8.7% [95% CI, 6.5%–11.5%]), there was a significant increase among adolescent girls (11.8% [CI, 6.9%–19.7%] during 2003–2008 vs 18.1% [CI, 11.0%–28.4%] during 2009–2014; P < .05; Supplemental Table 8).

We used directly observed medication data from nationally representative samples to examine use and concurrent use of prescription medications among children and adolescents in the United States. During 2013–2014, one-fifth of children and adolescents used at least 1 prescription medication and ∼1 in 10 concurrently used ≥2 prescription medications. Among children and adolescents concurrently using ≥2 prescription medications, 1 in 12 was at risk for a major DDI. Our findings are important because prescription medications are commonly used by children and adolescents in the United States, and population-level monitoring is needed to detect modifiable risk and optimize safe use.

Since 2003–2004, we observed a decline in the use of acute medications, corroborating findings from a previous analysis of pharmacy claims.22 This decline was mainly attributable to lower rates of antibiotic use, which was also observed in previous research. We also found, however, that acute medications were commonly used in potentially life-threatening drug combinations, particularly among adolescent girls. More than three-quarters of potential major DDIs we identified involved prescription medications used acutely (eg, macrolide antibiotics, antiemetics, and albuterol), and nearly half of these interacting combinations also involved an antidepressant. The potential for QT prolongation is especially noteworthy given that it is often asymptomatic and unpredictable yet can develop quickly into a serious arrhythmia or sudden cardiac death,23,24 a serious yet underreported problem in children and adolescents.25,26 Instability in insurance coverage for children and fragmentation of health care (eg, use of retail clinics and emergency departments for episodic care) may increase the risk that a physician prescribing medication for an acute illness is unaware of a child’s chronic medication regimen. Systemic strategies, including patient and provider access to accurate medication use data, are needed to reduce the risk of such major DDIs among children.

Highlighted in our findings is also an important opportunity to improve the safe use of medications among adolescent girls given that nearly 1 in 5 adolescent girls who concurrently used prescription medications was at risk for a DDI. The threefold higher prevalence of these interacting drug regimens among adolescent girls, when compared with adolescent boys, was largely due to a higher rate of tricyclic antidepressant use in combination with acute medications, most commonly macrolide antibiotics, antiemetics, NSAIDs, and proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). These acute medications may be prescribed to treat sexually transmitted infections (eg, azithromycin) or gastrointestinal symptoms (eg, ondansetron, omeprazole) from eating disorders.27,28 Some are also available over-the-counter (OTC), specifically NSAIDs and PPIs. Product labeling for OTC medications does not always include comprehensive information on adverse effects, including DDIs. For example, in the labeling for OTC omeprazole, the DDI between citalopram and omeprazole is not mentioned.29 Many adolescent girls and their parents may therefore not be aware of the cardiovascular risks associated with use.

We also found that prescription medications associated with an increased risk of suicidality are commonly used in children and adolescents and are often used together. For example, more than half of adolescent girls taking antidepressants concurrently use at least 2 additional psychotropic medications or hormonal contraceptives. Although there is some evidence that the combined use of these drugs may increase the onset and severity of suicidal thoughts and behavior,19,30 we found no cases of DDIs associated with suicidality. This finding is expected because suicidality, in contrast to serotonin syndrome and QT prolongation, is not captured as a potential DDI in existing drug interaction software,31 including Micromedex. Therefore, health care professionals, including psychiatrists, may not be fully aware of the suicidal risks associated with the concurrent use of prescription medications in the evaluation and treatment of depressive symptoms in younger patients.

With these findings, it is suggested that preventive efforts used to improve the safe use of medications by children should promote public and health professional awareness of the increased risks associated with concurrent use of prescription and OTC medications, particularly suicidality and QT prolongation. Such efforts may include incorporation of a list of commonly used medications and interacting combinations associated with increases in QT prolongation and suicidal risks in treatment guidelines and screening tools for depression. Efforts should be used to target both consumers and health professionals, including those involved in acute or episodic care. Such efforts are particularly important among adolescents considering suicide and cardiovascular events, as well as unintentional drug overdoses, are persistently leading causes of death.16,32 Nonmedical use of prescription drugs, including opioids, is also more prevalent in adolescents than in younger children33 and is known to increase risk for both suicide and sudden death.

This study has several limitations. We examined the potential for DDIs rather than actual adverse drug events. Prescribers might have been aware of the risks and benefits of coprescribing the medications, established an appropriate monitoring plan, and determined in discussion with the patient and/or caregiver that the potentially interacting regimen may be the best option for the patient. Second, our medication data were limited to prescription medications and were not used to capture information on OTC products. Therefore, we likely underestimate the rates of use, and potential DDIs, for several therapeutic classes (eg, antihistamines, PPIs, NSAIDs) that are widely available without a prescription. Moreover, OTC products, including acetaminophen and cough and cold medicines, are key contributors to adverse drug events in children.34 Third, we used the Micromedex drug interaction software to identify potentially major DDIs in our sample, and other drug interaction software may yield different estimates. However, the accuracy, including sensitivity and specificity, comprehensiveness, and usefulness of Micromedex has been previously established.35,36For example, authors of a study in which the various software for DDIs were evaluated ranked Micromedex the highest in accuracy.35 Fourth, the estimates for DDIs are for 30-day point prevalence. Therefore, it is possible that over a longer period of time, the concurrent use of potential DDIs is greater than our estimates.

In addition, the distinction between acute and chronic is not absolute; some medications initiated <30 days before data collection, yet intended for chronic use, may have been misclassified as acute. Last, for children <16 years old, a parent or guardian answered questions on their child’s use of prescription medications. Therefore, underreporting is possible, particularly for prescription medications surreptitiously used by the child. Finally, NHANES may be underpowered to examine the prevalence of medication use, resulting in unreliable nationwide estimates.

Using nationally representative data, we found that many children and adolescents use and concurrently use prescription medications in the United States. Among concurrent users of prescription medications, nearly 1 in 12 was at risk for a major DDI. Largely because of their higher rate of acute medication use, adolescent girls were at a higher risk of using interacting drug regimens than other subgroups. Treatment and prevention efforts to reduce the burden of adverse drug events in younger populations should be used to consider the role of interacting drug combinations, especially among these individuals.

     
  • CI

    confidence interval

  •  
  • CNS

    central nervous system

  •  
  • DDI

    drug–drug interaction

  •  
  • NSAID

    nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug

  •  
  • OTC

    over-the-counter

  •  
  • PPI

    proton pump inhibitor

Dr Qato conceptualized and designed the study, coordinated and supervised data analysis, drafted the initial manuscript, and reviewed and revised the manuscript critically for important intellectual content; Drs Alexander and Lindau conceptualized and designed the study, drafted the initial manuscript, and reviewed and revised the manuscript critically for important intellectual content; Ms Guadamuz conceptualized and designed the study, conducted the data analyses, drafted the initial manuscript, and reviewed and revised the manuscript; and all authors approved the final manuscript as submitted and agree to be accountable for all aspects of the work.

FUNDING: Dr Qato was supported in part by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation as part of the Clinical Scholars Leadership program. Ms Guadamuz was supported in part by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation as part of the Health Policy Research Scholar program. The views expressed here do not necessarily reflect the views of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

COMPANION PAPER: A companion to this article can be found online at www.pediatrics.org/cgi/doi/10.1542/peds.2018-2023.

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Competing Interests

POTENTIAL CONFLICT OF INTEREST: Dr Alexander is chair of the Food and Drug Administration’s Peripheral and Central Nervous System Advisory Committee; serves as a paid advisor to IQVIA; serves on the advisory board of MesaRx Innovations; holds equity in Monument Analytics, a health care consultancy whose clients include the life sciences industry as well as plaintiffs in opioid litigation; and serves as a member of OptumRx’s Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committee. This arrangement has been reviewed and approved by Johns Hopkins University in accordance with its conflict of interest policies; and the other authors have indicated they have no potential conflicts of interest to disclose.

FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE: Dr Qato serves as a paid consultant for Public Citizen’s Health Research Group; Dr Lindau is the founder and co-owner of NowPow, LLC; and the other authors have indicated they have no financial relationships relevant to this article to disclose.

Supplementary data