BACKGROUND: Well visits early in childhood are a pivotal part of children’s wellbeing, and parents look to physicians for education at these visits. In the current healthcare climate, patient satisfaction scores are becoming an integral part of the system. The aim of this quality improvement project was to increase both the number of guidance topics discussed and parent satisfaction with the visit through physician education components. METHODS: In a county-based pediatrics clinic, with both resident and attending physicians, parents were surveyed at the end of their child’s well visit. Children aged 2 months through 2 years were included, since these visits involve a variety of anticipatory guidance topics. Both Spanish and English surveys were provided. Two survey questions included Likert scales for overall satisfaction and assessment of time spent during the visit. Lastly, parents were asked to recall which overarching topics, out of a choice of 10, were covered for anticipatory guidance during the visit. Baseline data was collected prior to the intervention cycles as below. INTERVENTION: The first intervention round includes physician education about guidance to give during specific age group visits. In addition, physicians are encouraged to use a standardized handout to go over with parents in their after visit paperwork to help reinforce the topics with the family. The intervention is underway at this point in time. The second phase of intervention will be physician education around enhancing visit experience. Physicians will be educated on specific behaviors to help with parental recall of topics discussed during the visit. Survey data will be collected after each intervention to see if satisfaction and the number of topics recalled by parents will increase. These intervention cycles and data collection will be completed prior to the presentation date. RESULTS: Baseline data shows room for improvement in both parent satisfaction as well as the number of anticipatory guidance topics covered. The overall average satisfaction rate was 4.36 (out of 5). The average number of guidance topics discussed was 5.39 (out of 10). Data collection for surveys after the first and second interventions are pending. CONCLUSION: Throughout training, physicians are often not specifically taught about psychosocial interactions and ways to improve patient experience and satisfaction. The aim of this quality improvement project is to bring to light how education can improve well child care, and overall help parents be empowered when they leave a clinic visit.

Figure 1

Number of Topics Covered

Run chart demonstrating the variability in number of topics covered during a well visit

Figure 1

Number of Topics Covered

Run chart demonstrating the variability in number of topics covered during a well visit

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Figure 2

Parent Satisfaction

Run chart demonstrating the variability in parent satisfaction during a well visit

Figure 2

Parent Satisfaction

Run chart demonstrating the variability in parent satisfaction during a well visit

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