Introduction: Evaluation for a cardiac murmur is one of the most common reasons for cardiology referral in pediatric patients. Between 30-75% of those murmurs are found to be innocent, with Still';s murmurs being the most frequently diagnosed. These murmurs can often come and go throughout childhood, either with normal growth, or during times of physiologic stress. While it is known that innocent murmurs are commonly found in patients between the ages of 0 and 18 years, the exact prevalence of each of these murmurs is unknown. Purpose: This is an ongoing study, the purpose of which is to determine the prevalence of each type of innocent murmur (Still';s murmur, carotid bruit, pulmonary ejection murmur, peripheral pulmonary murmur, and venous hum). Methods: Preliminary data for this study was collected for a total of 6,159 participants ages 0 to 18 years old who presented for initial evaluation at 10 different outpatient pediatric cardiology clinics between January 1, 2017 and January 1, 2018. As this is an ongoing study, data verification is still in process. All new patients presenting to outpatient cardiology clinic participate in normal history and physical exams (including a regular cardiac exam), as is standard for new-patient visits. Checkboxes for each innocent murmur were incorporated into the physical exam templates utilized at the outpatient clinics. Electronic medical records for study participants are expected to be queried over a two-year period to classify each of the five innocent murmurs by age, gender, race, and concurrent occurrence of congenital heart disease. Results: Of the collected records, 3967 have been verified, 2025 (51.04%) of which were found to have one of the five innocent murmurs. Females comprised 45.88% of those found to have murmurs (929 patients) and males comprised 54.12% (1096 patients). 297 of the verified patients with murmurs were further classified by murmur type: Still';s (163 patients, 54.88%), pulmonary ejection (79 patients, 26.60%), peripheral pulmonary (29 patients, 9.76%), venous hum (26 patients, 8.75%), and carotid bruit (no patients). The average ages ranged from 4.04 years old (venous hum) to 6.49 years old (pulmonary ejection murmur). Conclusion: This is a continuing analysis with initial data showing that innocent murmurs are highly prevalent in the pediatric population, Still';s murmurs and pulmonary ejection murmurs being the most commonly found innocent murmurs. Preliminary data also shows a slight male predominance in the prevalence of innocent murmurs. As we continue to collect, review, and verify the data, we aim to further characterize these murmurs according to race and association with concurrent occurrence of congenital heart disease. We hope to delineate additional demographic patterns so as to better understand the occurrence of innocent murmurs in the pediatric population.

Summary of preliminary demographic data characterized by type of innocent murmur

Summary of preliminary demographic data characterized by type of innocent murmur

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