Purpose: To estimate changes in the incidence of trampoline-related pediatric fractures that presented to United States emergency departments between 2008 and 2017. Methods: The National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS) was queried for all pediatric (0-17 years of age) fractures related to trampoline use between 2008 and 2017. Year, gender, anatomical location, locale of injury (home, sport, etc.), and age were collected. A Poisson regression analysis was used to analyze changes in trampoline fracture incidence over the decade. U.S. census data was used as the denominator in all incidence calculations. A logistic regression analysis was used to analyze temporal trends in the odds of a fracture occurring at a place of recreation or sport over the past decade. Variance estimates were obtained using the jackknife method of variance estimation to account for the NEISS complex survey design. Results: In 2008, the incidence of pediatric trampoline fractures was 35.3 per 100,000 person-years. This number rose to 53.0 per 100,000 person-years in 2017. Over the past decade, the incidence of trampoline-related pediatric fractures increased by an average of 3.85% [95% CI: 0.51-7.30%]. When expressed as a percentage of all fractures, trampoline fractures accounted for 3.75% of all U.S. pediatric fractures during the study period. Upper extremity fractures were the most common injury site, accounting for 56% of trampoline fractures. There was also a change in the locale of trampoline-related fractures (Figure 2). A significant increase in the odds of a fracture occurring at a place of sport or recreation over the past decade was observed [Odds Ratio per year: 1.32, 95% CI: 1.21-1.43, p <0.0001]. Conclusion: The U.S. experienced a significant increase in pediatric trampoline fractures between 2008 and 2017. In 2008, trampoline-related fractures accounted for 3.59% [95% CI: 3.04-4.14%] of all pediatric fractures. By 2017, 6.16% [95% CI: 5.31-7.01%] of all fractures were caused by trampolines (Figure 1). The proportion of recreation or sport related trampoline fractures also increased significantly from 2008-2017, which coincided with a rise in popularity of trampoline parks. Additional research is needed to understand the factors driving the recent surge in trampoline-related fracture incidence and shifting trends in locale of fracture. Future advocacy campaigns should consider all avenues of trampoline participation in their prevention efforts. Significance: Trampolines are a significant source of orthopedic-related fractures, a trend that has increased over the past decade.

Percentage of All Pediatric Fracures per Year

Figure 1

Percentage of all national pediatric fractures related to trampolines.

Figure 1

Percentage of all national pediatric fractures related to trampolines.

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Percentage of Trampoline Fracture Locale per Year

Figure 2

Locale of injury as percentage of all pediatric trampoline fractures.

Figure 2

Locale of injury as percentage of all pediatric trampoline fractures.

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