A correction has been made to the article by Chua K et al, titled “Out-of-Pocket Spending for Deliveries and Newborn Hospitalizations Among the Privately Insured,” published in the July 2021 issue of Pediatrics (2021:148[1]:e2021050552; doi:10.1542/peds.2021-050552).

On page 1, in the Methods section, paragraph 3, the text read as follows: “Out-of-pocket spending equaled the sum of deductibles, coinsurance, and copayments. We adjusted this spending to 2019 dollars using the Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers.4 For each family, we calculated out-of-pocket spending for the delivery and newborn hospitalization(s); the sum of these quantities was ‘total out-of-pocket spending.’ We calculated mean total out-of-pocket spending and the proportion of episodes with total out-of-pocket spending exceeding $5000 and $10 000.”

To clarify the definition of the outcome, the authors requested that the above text be replaced with the following: “The outcome was out-of-pocket spending, defined as the sum of deductibles, coinsurance, and copayments. This quantity represents the minimum amount families owe for childbirth hospitalizations. An additional potential source of financial liability comes from ‘surprise bills,’ defined as charges from out-of-network providers for care at in-network hospitals. These bills were beyond the scope of this analysis but were assessed in a separate article.4

“We adjusted out-of-pocket spending to 2019 dollars using the Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers.5 For each family, we calculated out-of-pocket spending for the delivery and newborn hospitalization(s); the sum of these quantities was ‘total out-of-pocket spending.’ We calculated mean total out-of-pocket spending and the proportion of episodes with total out-of-pocket spending exceeding $5000 and $10 000.”

A new reference 4 has been inserted, renumbering the previous references “4–7” to “5–8.”

The new reference reads as follows: 4. Chua KP, Fendrick AM, Conti RM, Moniz MH. Prevalence and magnitude of potential surprise bills for childbirth. JAMA Health Forum. 2021;2(7):e211460.

The online article has been corrected.