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TABLE 3

Selection of Representative Parent Quotes on Engaging in ADHD Treatment Stage 1: Normalization and Hesitation (“He’s Gonna Grow Out of It”)

SubcategoryNormalization and Hesitation Quotes (Representative Selection)Parent and Child Information
Hesitation “I just kept telling myself he’s gonna grow out of it.… Once he gets, you know, older and he starts school and he’s in kindergarten, he has more structure, like, he’ll grow out of it, and he just didn’t.” 31 y-old mother of a 7 y-old boy 
 “Well imagine that when they told me I had doubted it, that’s why I didn’t want to give him pills, I did that later. I thought, ‘It cannot be happening, no. My child does not have that.…’ But like I told you…but seeing that he was dropping grades, I previously said no, but then I said yes to the pill. That’s when I was convinced that he had that.” 49 y-old mother of a 11 y-old boy 
 “When they diagnosed them of ADHD and the behaviors that they was doing, I said to them, ‘I just don’t understand because they’re up to age and they should know better. And I see that in different situations, how it can be controlled. Yet, you all diagnosed them as ADHD. I still don’t really understand it too much.’ But they diagnosed them with that.” 62 y-old mother of a 10 y-old girl 
 “And, I find that a lot of even her own dad, he doesn’t think she has ADHD. He keeps telling me, ‘Oh, it’s just growing pains. She’s just a child growing up. This is what they do.’” 43 y-old mother of a 9 y-old girl 
 “Because I was tired, you know. After I came out of that denial state, I started to accept it. And so, I think that’s what a lot of parents…sometimes could be in denial because you don’t want a kid that has, you know, any issues.” 50 y-old mother of a 10 y-old boy 
Worsening impairment leading to acceptance “And, it just got in a snowball from there, so that’s when I took her…to a pediatrician and said…you guys should take a look at it.” 43 y-old mother of a 9 y-old girl 
 “Well, the old school that she was in at first, the one that she got kicked out of, was the one that picked up and felt like something was going on with her because she couldn’t stay focused.… Then the hospital picked up on it, so then we wound up sending her to a specialist, which the specialist, they ran tests and all different types of things and they found out that she did have it.” 43 y-old mother of an 8 y-old girl 
 “When we first met her she was pretty much sure this is what was happening with him, because he would just be all over the place unable to focus on anything, touching everything. To me, it was him being a child. I don’t know. So things started getting a little bit out of hand at home with him.” 36 y-old mother of an 8 y-old boy 
Learning about ADHD facilitating acceptance “Actually, it was pretty good when they were working with me. I just didn’t want to accept that he was diagnosed with ADHD because I really didn’t understand like the ADHD. I didn’t know what it was until we started working with these, there was like agencies that were coming in the home working with him too.” 51 y-old mother of a 17 y-old boy 
 “The first time around I knew nothing. There was a steep learning curve…it was like a new world with my first child with ADHD and that was tough because I didn’t know what to expect. Everything he did, I was reading… ‘My goodness. Is that normal?… Is that because of the ADHD or is it because of something else?’… It was more of a nerve-wracking experience because it was all new.” 40 y-old mother of a 9 y-old girl 
 “Just give them more information. It’s a real thing. It has real treatment. And, it can affect your kids’ success long-term. I really do think that the most important piece is that it affects how they feel about themselves.” 49 y-old mother of a 14 y-old boy 
 “I’ve already been through it with my daughter. My daughter is 26 years old. She was diagnosed with ADHD when she was six.… Everything I’m going through with him, I already been through with my daughter. So I learned over the years to have more patience and understanding.…” 42 y-old mother of a 13 y-old boy 
SubcategoryNormalization and Hesitation Quotes (Representative Selection)Parent and Child Information
Hesitation “I just kept telling myself he’s gonna grow out of it.… Once he gets, you know, older and he starts school and he’s in kindergarten, he has more structure, like, he’ll grow out of it, and he just didn’t.” 31 y-old mother of a 7 y-old boy 
 “Well imagine that when they told me I had doubted it, that’s why I didn’t want to give him pills, I did that later. I thought, ‘It cannot be happening, no. My child does not have that.…’ But like I told you…but seeing that he was dropping grades, I previously said no, but then I said yes to the pill. That’s when I was convinced that he had that.” 49 y-old mother of a 11 y-old boy 
 “When they diagnosed them of ADHD and the behaviors that they was doing, I said to them, ‘I just don’t understand because they’re up to age and they should know better. And I see that in different situations, how it can be controlled. Yet, you all diagnosed them as ADHD. I still don’t really understand it too much.’ But they diagnosed them with that.” 62 y-old mother of a 10 y-old girl 
 “And, I find that a lot of even her own dad, he doesn’t think she has ADHD. He keeps telling me, ‘Oh, it’s just growing pains. She’s just a child growing up. This is what they do.’” 43 y-old mother of a 9 y-old girl 
 “Because I was tired, you know. After I came out of that denial state, I started to accept it. And so, I think that’s what a lot of parents…sometimes could be in denial because you don’t want a kid that has, you know, any issues.” 50 y-old mother of a 10 y-old boy 
Worsening impairment leading to acceptance “And, it just got in a snowball from there, so that’s when I took her…to a pediatrician and said…you guys should take a look at it.” 43 y-old mother of a 9 y-old girl 
 “Well, the old school that she was in at first, the one that she got kicked out of, was the one that picked up and felt like something was going on with her because she couldn’t stay focused.… Then the hospital picked up on it, so then we wound up sending her to a specialist, which the specialist, they ran tests and all different types of things and they found out that she did have it.” 43 y-old mother of an 8 y-old girl 
 “When we first met her she was pretty much sure this is what was happening with him, because he would just be all over the place unable to focus on anything, touching everything. To me, it was him being a child. I don’t know. So things started getting a little bit out of hand at home with him.” 36 y-old mother of an 8 y-old boy 
Learning about ADHD facilitating acceptance “Actually, it was pretty good when they were working with me. I just didn’t want to accept that he was diagnosed with ADHD because I really didn’t understand like the ADHD. I didn’t know what it was until we started working with these, there was like agencies that were coming in the home working with him too.” 51 y-old mother of a 17 y-old boy 
 “The first time around I knew nothing. There was a steep learning curve…it was like a new world with my first child with ADHD and that was tough because I didn’t know what to expect. Everything he did, I was reading… ‘My goodness. Is that normal?… Is that because of the ADHD or is it because of something else?’… It was more of a nerve-wracking experience because it was all new.” 40 y-old mother of a 9 y-old girl 
 “Just give them more information. It’s a real thing. It has real treatment. And, it can affect your kids’ success long-term. I really do think that the most important piece is that it affects how they feel about themselves.” 49 y-old mother of a 14 y-old boy 
 “I’ve already been through it with my daughter. My daughter is 26 years old. She was diagnosed with ADHD when she was six.… Everything I’m going through with him, I already been through with my daughter. So I learned over the years to have more patience and understanding.…” 42 y-old mother of a 13 y-old boy 
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