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TABLE 8

Selection of Representative Parent Quotes on Engaging in ADHD Treatment Stage 6: Preparation and Transition (“Life Is Not Easy”)

SubcategoryPreparation and Transition Quotes (Representative Selection)Parent and Child Information
Concern about child’s future “I hope that she’s able to overcome these things and be able to get a good job…and a good education.” 40-y-old mother of a 3-y-old girl 
 “I feel like if his lack of attention and the concentration gets in the way of his schooling, then it’s like, what kind of job will he have? Even in the trades you have to pay attention, you need to learn what to do.” 42-y-old mother of a 10-y-old boy 
 “I don’t know what’s going to happen to him when he grows up because I have [another] son who has the same type of problems and it’s been a struggle with my son.” 50-y-old mother of a 13-y-old boy 
 “But…I’ve got to let go a little bit, because if I keep doing this, then he’s not going to learn to cope at all. And then, God forbid, I’ll probably make him even more worse than he already is…I’ve got to sit back and let him try to figure this out because I’m not going to be around here forever.” 34-y-old mother of a 14-y-old boy 
Preparation for independence “They’re always going to be choosing bad choices. I can see it. It’s going to be a huge problem in their life when they get older. I’m trying to prevent it now by getting all this help, [counseling].” 62-y-old mother of a 10-y-old girl 
 “I think that’s one of the positives about getting them treatment or help with the doctor, that I’m able to trust that they’re going to be okay.” 29-y-old mother of an 8-y-old boy 
 “I want her to become a productive.… I say this to her every day, ‘My goal is for you to grow up to be a productive member of society. What that is is you need to be contributing, paying your own bills, making your own way in life, not depending on someone, no one. You’re supposed to be independent of…you’re gonna be better than I am right at this point,’ you know?” 43-y-old mother of a 9-y-old girl 
Discussing ADHD with child “I told him, ‘Everybody’s different. Some people need extra help with certain things. Some people don’t.’ I try to express to him as much as possible that no matter what he’s still going to be loved…I told him it’s always good to be different. He doesn’t have to be like everybody else.” 29-y-old mother of an 8-y-old boy 
 “I tell her all the time, ‘Life is not easy. It’s not. You’re gonna find a lot of challenges out there but you having ADHD is gonna be a little bit more difficult for you. And so, you have to learn to navigate the best way you can, and that’s what I’m here for.’” 43-y-old mother of a 9-y-old girl 
 “They just have to know it’s okay and what I tell my son is, ‘You are not dumb, you are not ugly. You have a mirror. When you get up in the morning you look at yourself. Do you like yourself?’ ‘I like myself, Mommy.’ ‘That’s all that matters.’” 36-y-old mother of an 8-y-old boy 
 “I just got to have more patience, more understanding, more, you know. Especially more like communication with your kid…with him. When your kid has that kind of problem you need to have more communication. See, try to go into their world. See how they feel, what they think, you know what I mean? And I try to do that with my son.” 42-y-old mother of a 13-y-old boy 
 “I want him to always know that, to be confident in yourself with who you are regardless of what anyone around you thinks or regardless of what statistics show about ADHD.” 30-y-old mother of a 12-y-old boy 
Hesitation to discuss ADHD with child “It’s like a labeling thing.… You don’t want your kid to feel uncomfortable. And the next thing you know, ‘I don’t want to go to school anymore.’” 33-y-old mother of a 9-y-old girl 
 “Don’t sit there and diagnose cause he’s gonna feel like, ‘Wait my what? My huh? How come I’m hearing about this…from everybody, so there’s something wrong with me’.… I don’t want him to ever think he is different than anybody else.” 42-y-old mother of a 6-y-old boy 
 “I tell him things like that so that he doesn’t use these things for an excuse. Because growing up if you do something you’re not supposed to do and law enforcement is involved, they don’t want to hear, ‘Oh it’s the ADHD.’ That doesn’t matter. So I always tell him what’s real.… So far by me doing that, it helps him.” 30-y-old mother of a 12-y-old boy 
SubcategoryPreparation and Transition Quotes (Representative Selection)Parent and Child Information
Concern about child’s future “I hope that she’s able to overcome these things and be able to get a good job…and a good education.” 40-y-old mother of a 3-y-old girl 
 “I feel like if his lack of attention and the concentration gets in the way of his schooling, then it’s like, what kind of job will he have? Even in the trades you have to pay attention, you need to learn what to do.” 42-y-old mother of a 10-y-old boy 
 “I don’t know what’s going to happen to him when he grows up because I have [another] son who has the same type of problems and it’s been a struggle with my son.” 50-y-old mother of a 13-y-old boy 
 “But…I’ve got to let go a little bit, because if I keep doing this, then he’s not going to learn to cope at all. And then, God forbid, I’ll probably make him even more worse than he already is…I’ve got to sit back and let him try to figure this out because I’m not going to be around here forever.” 34-y-old mother of a 14-y-old boy 
Preparation for independence “They’re always going to be choosing bad choices. I can see it. It’s going to be a huge problem in their life when they get older. I’m trying to prevent it now by getting all this help, [counseling].” 62-y-old mother of a 10-y-old girl 
 “I think that’s one of the positives about getting them treatment or help with the doctor, that I’m able to trust that they’re going to be okay.” 29-y-old mother of an 8-y-old boy 
 “I want her to become a productive.… I say this to her every day, ‘My goal is for you to grow up to be a productive member of society. What that is is you need to be contributing, paying your own bills, making your own way in life, not depending on someone, no one. You’re supposed to be independent of…you’re gonna be better than I am right at this point,’ you know?” 43-y-old mother of a 9-y-old girl 
Discussing ADHD with child “I told him, ‘Everybody’s different. Some people need extra help with certain things. Some people don’t.’ I try to express to him as much as possible that no matter what he’s still going to be loved…I told him it’s always good to be different. He doesn’t have to be like everybody else.” 29-y-old mother of an 8-y-old boy 
 “I tell her all the time, ‘Life is not easy. It’s not. You’re gonna find a lot of challenges out there but you having ADHD is gonna be a little bit more difficult for you. And so, you have to learn to navigate the best way you can, and that’s what I’m here for.’” 43-y-old mother of a 9-y-old girl 
 “They just have to know it’s okay and what I tell my son is, ‘You are not dumb, you are not ugly. You have a mirror. When you get up in the morning you look at yourself. Do you like yourself?’ ‘I like myself, Mommy.’ ‘That’s all that matters.’” 36-y-old mother of an 8-y-old boy 
 “I just got to have more patience, more understanding, more, you know. Especially more like communication with your kid…with him. When your kid has that kind of problem you need to have more communication. See, try to go into their world. See how they feel, what they think, you know what I mean? And I try to do that with my son.” 42-y-old mother of a 13-y-old boy 
 “I want him to always know that, to be confident in yourself with who you are regardless of what anyone around you thinks or regardless of what statistics show about ADHD.” 30-y-old mother of a 12-y-old boy 
Hesitation to discuss ADHD with child “It’s like a labeling thing.… You don’t want your kid to feel uncomfortable. And the next thing you know, ‘I don’t want to go to school anymore.’” 33-y-old mother of a 9-y-old girl 
 “Don’t sit there and diagnose cause he’s gonna feel like, ‘Wait my what? My huh? How come I’m hearing about this…from everybody, so there’s something wrong with me’.… I don’t want him to ever think he is different than anybody else.” 42-y-old mother of a 6-y-old boy 
 “I tell him things like that so that he doesn’t use these things for an excuse. Because growing up if you do something you’re not supposed to do and law enforcement is involved, they don’t want to hear, ‘Oh it’s the ADHD.’ That doesn’t matter. So I always tell him what’s real.… So far by me doing that, it helps him.” 30-y-old mother of a 12-y-old boy 
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